Cherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias Boudinot by Theda PerdueCherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias Boudinot by Theda Perdue

Cherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias Boudinot

EditorTheda Perdue

Paperback | February 1, 1996

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This volume collects most of the writings published by the accomplished Cherokee leader Elias Boudinot (1804?-1839). Founding editor of the Cherokee Phoenix, Boudinot is the most ambiguous and puzzling figure in Cherokee history. Although he first struggled against the removal of his people from their native Southeast, Boudinot later reversed his position and signed the Treaty of New Echota, an action that cost him his life.

Together with Theda Perdue's biographical introduction and in-depth annotations, these letters, articles, pamphlets, and editorials document the stages of Boudinot's religious, philosophical, and political growth, from his early optimism that the Cherokees could completely assimilate into white society to his call for a separate nation of "civilized" Cherokees.

Theda Perdue is the Atlanta Distinguished Professor of Southern Culture at the University of North Carolina. Her seven books include The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears and “Mixed Blood” Indians (Georgia).
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Title:Cherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias BoudinotFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 8 × 5 × 19 inPublished:February 1, 1996Publisher:University Of Georgia Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820318094

ISBN - 13:9780820318097

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Reviews

From Our Editors

This volume collects most of the writings published by the accomplished Cherokee leader Elias Boudinot (1804?-1839). Founding editor of the Cherokee Phoenix, Boudinot is the most ambiguous and puzzling figure in Cherokee history. Although he first struggled against the removal of his people from their native Southeast, Boudinot later reversed his position and signed the Treaty of New Echota, an action that cost him his life. Together with Theda Perdue's biographical introduction and in-depth annotations, these letters, articles, pamphlets, and editorials document the stages of Boudinot's religious, philosophical, and political growth, from his early optimism that the Cherokees could completely assimilate into white society to his call for a separate nation of "civilized" Cherokees.

Editorial Reviews

Perdue has done an invaluable service in gathering together Boudinot's early published writings and providing a running critical commentary on his defense of Indian 'progress.'

- Journal of the Early Republic