Chess Game for Democracy: Hungary between East and West, 1944-1947 by Mária PalasikChess Game for Democracy: Hungary between East and West, 1944-1947 by Mária Palasik

Chess Game for Democracy: Hungary between East and West, 1944-1947

byMária Palasik

Paperback | May 10, 2011

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In Chess Game for Democracy, Mária Palasik examines this ill-fated conflict to explain how it was possible for the parties to work together in a coalition government, while constantly at odds with each other. Her reconstruction of the debates over the introduction of the law to protect the republic against conspiracy and the politics behind the Hungarian Brotherhood show trial are grounded in her pathbreaking research in the archives of the state security agencies. Through the case study of a single country, Chess Game for Democracy makes a major contribution to ongoing debates on the origins of the Cold War in Europe and the process of Sovietization in Central and Eastern Europe, improving our understanding of European history post World War Two and of the reasons for changing relations between the superpowers.
Mária Palasik is a senior researcher at the Historical Archives of the Hungarian State Security. She had been professor at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics for over twenty years and has been Jean Monnet Professor for European Studies since 2004.
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Title:Chess Game for Democracy: Hungary between East and West, 1944-1947Format:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:May 10, 2011Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:077353850X

ISBN - 13:9780773538504

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Editorial Reviews

“A major contribution to our understanding of the process of Sovietization in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as the changing relations between the superpowers. By highlighting the efforts of those that led the struggle to establish a multiparty democratic system, she counters the myth that communism was introduced immediately after World War II and that there was no chance for democracy. Her book will be essential reading for those interested in the unique period from 1945 to 1948 and the process by which the Communist Party came to power in Hungary.” H-Net Reviews