Childhood, Memory and Autobiography in Holland: From the Golden Age to Romanticism

Hardcover | December 3, 1999

byRudolf Dekker

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Between the 17th and 19th centuries, autobiographers and diarists invented new ways to write about childhood and children. At the same time, pedagogical ideas about child-rearing changed. This book looks at the connection between these developments. Childhood became more highly valued as a phase of life, and children were taken more seriously. This is shown in chapters on child's play, punishment, wet-nursing, and independence. Around 1800, in diaries, parents more openly grieved about the loss of a child, which indicated both a change of literary conventions and changes in the way emotions were felt and expressed. Finally, autobiographers wrote more and differently about their early years, and developed new memory strategies.

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Between the 17th and 19th centuries, autobiographers and diarists invented new ways to write about childhood and children. At the same time, pedagogical ideas about child-rearing changed. This book looks at the connection between these developments. Childhood became more highly valued as a phase of life, and children were taken more se...

Rudolf Dekker teaches history at the Faculty of History and Art of the Eramus University.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:186 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.56 inPublished:December 3, 1999Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0312225075

ISBN - 13:9780312225070

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Table of Contents

Part I: Introduction * The History of Childhood * Egodocuments and History * Part II: Portraits * Children of a Bourgeois * Children of an Artisan * Children of a Farmer * An Enlightened Education * The New Adolescent * Pedagogical Problems * Part III: Moving Images * Children's Play * Threats and Thrashings * Mothers and Wet-Nurses * Independence * The Child We Once Were * The Expression of Emotions