Children Learning To Read: A Guide For Parents And Teachers

Hardcover | June 1, 1996

bySeymour W. Itzkoff

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This volume brings together the sciences of psycholinguistics and developmental psychology with the practical knowledge of classroom practice in literacy education to create a unique, but accessible explanation of how children learn to read. It explains the necessary educational and pedagogical steps that parents and teachers both can take in assisting the child to make a smooth transition from infant babbler to eight-year-old fluent reader. It also points to the possible developmental as well as educational danger signals that tell us when things are not going as they should and suggests what we can do to overcome the problems, slowdowns, and seeming failures to learn to read and write. This volume discusses such important issues as emergent literacy or reading readiness; phonics and slow reading; fluent reading and the "reading system"; the dangers of the first-grade Rubicon; reading problems of unique children; the dangers and benefits of "Whole Language" reading rograms; "Reading Recovery" for endangered young readers; the role of writing; parents, TV, and the school program. The book is clearly written, uses nontechnical terminology, and should provide teachers and parents a guide to evaluating the progress of youngsters from the time they approach child-care and pre-school stages of socialization to that point where they should be reading independently for pleasure as well as searching for information and subject-matter competency.

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From Our Editors

This volume brings together the sciences of psycholinguistics and developmental psychology with the practical knowledge of classroom practice in literacy education to create a unique but accessible explanation of how children learn to read. It explains the necessary educational and pedagogical steps that parents and teachers both can t...

From the Publisher

This volume brings together the sciences of psycholinguistics and developmental psychology with the practical knowledge of classroom practice in literacy education to create a unique, but accessible explanation of how children learn to read. It explains the necessary educational and pedagogical steps that parents and teachers both can ...

From the Jacket

This volume brings together the sciences of psycholinguistics and developmental psychology with the practical knowledge of classroom practice in literacy education to create a unique but accessible explanation of how children learn to read. It explains the necessary educational and pedagogical steps that parents and teachers both can t...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:216 pages, 9.54 × 6.42 × 0.88 inPublished:June 1, 1996Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275954366

ISBN - 13:9780275954369

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From Our Editors

This volume brings together the sciences of psycholinguistics and developmental psychology with the practical knowledge of classroom practice in literacy education to create a unique but accessible explanation of how children learn to read. It explains the necessary educational and pedagogical steps that parents and teachers both can take in assisting the child to make a smooth transition from infant babbler to eight-year-old fluent reader. It also points to the possible developmental as well as educational danger signals that tell us that things are not going as they should, and suggests what we can do to help children overcome their problems, slowdowns, and difficulties learning to read and write. Included here is a discussion of such important issues as emergent literacy or reading readiness: phonics and slow reading; fluent reading and the "reading system"; the dangers of the first-grade Rubicon; reading problems of unique children; the dangers and benefits of "Whole Language" reading programs; Reading Recovery" for endangered young readers; the role of writin

Editorial Reviews

?[A] readily accessible and clearly organized explanation of how teachers and parents can assist children in learning to read. Arguing that reading begins with the individuality of children and their interaction with the external world, the author discusses the pros and cons of both phonics and whole-language approaches, the interrelationship of writing and reading, literacy, and the uniqueness of each child's individual developmental stages. He also explores reading readiness and at-risk students and offers advice for those working with beginning readers...the information...is current and the writing is professional but not wrought with heavy jargon. The 22-page bibliography should be a useful tool for interested parents, reading instruction practitioners, and undergraduate students of elementary education. Recommended for libraries where these groups are served.?-Library Journal