Chinese Cinema During The Era Of Reform: The Ingenuity Of The System

Hardcover | August 31, 2003

byYing Zhu

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The political economy and culture of Chinese cinema during the era of China's prolonged economic reform has not until now been examined in detail. Ying Zhu's new and comprehensive study examines the institutional as well as the stylistic transitions of Chinese cinema from pedagogy to art to commerce, focusing on the key film reform measures as well as the metamorphosis of Chinese Fifth Generation films from art film narration-as in Chen Kaige's 1984 Yellow Earth-to post-New-Wave classical film narration-as in the same director's 1993 Farewell, My Concubine. Zhu also considers the films of a younger generation, the so-called "underground generation," which has been making both critical and commercial waves in recent years. Of use to Asian Studies scholars and film scholars alike, her work reconciles the stylistic, cultural, and economic dimensions of the nation's cinematic output, also providing the first systematic institutional analysis of an industry in a state of constant flux.

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The political economy and culture of Chinese cinema during the era of China's prolonged economic reform has not until now been examined in detail. Ying Zhu's new and comprehensive study examines the institutional as well as the stylistic transitions of Chinese cinema from pedagogy to art to commerce, focusing on the key film reform mea...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:248 pages, 9.56 × 6.4 × 0.9 inPublished:August 31, 2003Publisher:Praeger PublishersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275979598

ISBN - 13:9780275979591

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?[P]rovides ample evidence for a reperiodization of post-1976 Chinese film production according to changes in the institutional and political economic structure of filmmaking. As such, it emphasizes market-oriented reforms within China's domestic industries as the overarching "generative mechanism" responsible for the undeniable status of most contemporary Chinese cinema as a form of commercial entertainment....[p]rovides a solid foundation for further inquiry into the relations between social and cultural form, revising several cherished assumptions concerning China's best-known filmmakers in the process.??Journal of Third World Studies