Chinese Encounters in Southeast Asia: How People, Money, and Ideas from China Are Changing a Region

Paperback | November 21, 2016

EditorPál Nyíri, Danielle TanForeword byWang Gungwu

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This is the first book to focus explicitly on how China’s rise as a major economic and political actor has affected societies in Southeast Asia. It examines how Chinese investors, workers, tourists, bureaucrats, longtime residents, and adventurers interact throughout Southeast Asia. The contributors use case studies to show the scale of Chinese influence in the region and the ways in which various countries mitigate their unequal relationship with China by negotiating asymmetry, circumventing hegemony, and embracing, resisting, or manipulating the terms dictated by Chinese capital.   

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This is the first book to focus explicitly on how China’s rise as a major economic and political actor has affected societies in Southeast Asia. It examines how Chinese investors, workers, tourists, bureaucrats, longtime residents, and adventurers interact throughout Southeast Asia. The contributors use case studies to show the scale o...

Pál Nyíri is professor of global history at Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. He is the author of Scenic Spots: Chinese Tourism, Cultural Authority, and the State. Danielle Tan is research associate at the Institute of East Asian Studies (IAO-ENS Lyon), France, and at the Research Institute on Contemporary Southeast Asia (IRASEC, Bangk...
Format:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 21, 2016Publisher:University of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295999306

ISBN - 13:9780295999302

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This important collection provides tantalizing accounts of how traders, entrepreneurs, workers, teachers, students, and tourists from the PRC are opening up borderlands and variously embedding themselves into nations to the south. The accelerating outflow of PRC people has made ‘Chinese’ identities—richly ambiguous and multivalent—a critical form of transnational social capital in the midst of local resistances, skepticism, and accommodation in Southeast Asia. - Aihwa Ong, author of Fungible Life: Experiment in the Asian City of Life