Chinua Achebes Things Fall Apart: A Casebook

Paperback | September 10, 2003

EditorIsidore Okpewho

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Chinua Achebe is Africa's most prominent writer, and Things Fall Apart (1958) is the most renowned and widely-read African novel in the global literary canon. Translated into close to sixty languages, Things Fall Apart is the novel that inaugurated the long and continuing tradition ofpostcolonial inquiry into the problematic relations between the West and the countries of the Third World that were once European colonies. This collection explores the artistic, multicultural, and global significance of Things Fall Apart from a variety of critical perspectives. The essays selected for this casebook represent the most important and well-established critical work written on the novel to date. This volume also containsan editor's introduction, an interview with Chinua Achebe, and suggestions for further reading.

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Chinua Achebe is Africa's most prominent writer, and Things Fall Apart (1958) is the most renowned and widely-read African novel in the global literary canon. Translated into close to sixty languages, Things Fall Apart is the novel that inaugurated the long and continuing tradition ofpostcolonial inquiry into the problematic relations ...

Isidore Okpewho is Professor of Africana Studies, English, and Comparative Literature at SUNY at Binghamton.

other books by Isidore Okpewho

Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 5.51 × 8.19 × 0.98 inPublished:September 10, 2003Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195147642

ISBN - 13:9780195147643

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Chinua Achebe: The African Writer and the English Language2. Clement Okafor: Igbo Cosmology and the Parameters of Individual Accomplishment in Things Fall Apart3. Damian U. Opata: Eternal Sacred Order versus Conventional Wisdom: A Consideration of Moral Culpability in the Killing of Ikemefuna in Things Fall Apart4. Harold Scheub: "When a Man Fails Alone": A Man and his chi in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart5. Neil ten Kortenaar: How the Center is Made to Hold in Things Fall Apart6. Clayton G. MacKenzie: The Metamorphosis of Piety in Things Fall Apart7. Rhonda Cobham: Problems of Gender and History in the Teaching of Things Fall Apart8. Biodun Jeyifo: Okonkwo and His Mother: Things Fall Apart and Issues of Gender in the Constitution of African Postcolonial Discourse9. Bu-Buakei Jabbi: Fire and Transition in Things Fall Apart10. Ato Quayson: Realism, Criticism, and the Disguises of Both: A Reading of Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart with an evaluation of Criticism Relating To It11. Charles H. Rowell: An interview with Chinua AchebeSuggested Reading1. The African Writer and the English Language: Chinua Achebe2. Clement Okafor: Igbo Cosmology and the Parameters of Individual Accomplishment in Things Fall Apart3. Damian U. Opata: Eternal Sacred Order versus Conventional Wisdom: A Consideration of Moral Culpability in the Killing of Ikemefuna in Things Fall Apart4. Harold Scheub: When a Man Fails Alone: A Man and his Chi in Chinua Achebes Things Fall Apart5. Neil ten Kortenaar: How the Center is Made to Hold in Things Fall Apart6. Clayton G. MacKenzie: The Metamorphosis of Piety in Things Fall Apart7. Rhonda Cobham: Problems of Gender and History in the Teaching of Things Fall Apart8. Biodun Jeyifo: Okonkwo and His Mother: Things Fall Apart and Issues of Gender in the Constitution of African Postcolonial Discourse9. Bu-Buakei Jabbi: Fire and Transition in Things Fall Apart10. Ato Quayson: Realism, Criticism, and the Disguises of Both: A Reading of Chinua Achebes Things Fall Apart with an Evaluation of Criticism Relating To It11. Charles H. Rowell: An interview with Chinua AchebeSuggested Reading

Editorial Reviews

"Okpewho has been particularly successful in the careful selection of these essays which make the novel as relevant as it ever has been. What is most satisfying is not only the high quality of most of the essays, but also their overall arrangement so that they seem to be in dialogue with oneanother. This creates a logical thread throughout the book, and it makes for an engaging read."--African Studies Quarterly