Christianity and Democracy: A Theology for a Just World Order by John W. de GruchyChristianity and Democracy: A Theology for a Just World Order by John W. de Gruchy

Christianity and Democracy: A Theology for a Just World Order

byJohn W. de Gruchy, John W. De Gruchy

Paperback | June 30, 1995

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In this important study John de Gruchy examines the past, present and future roles of Christianity in the development of democracy. He traces the relationship from its gestation in early Christendom to its virtual breakdown as democracy becomes the polity of modernity, and focuses on five twentieth-century case studies, including Nazi Germany and South Africa, which demonstrate the revival of the churches as a force in the struggle for democracy. His conclusions point the way to the development of a theology for a just world order.
Title:Christianity and Democracy: A Theology for a Just World OrderFormat:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.71 inPublished:June 30, 1995Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521458412

ISBN - 13:9780521458412

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Table of Contents

Introduction; Part I. The System and the Vision: 1. Democracy: an open-ended tradition; 2. The prophetic vision; Part II. Historical and Theological Connections: 3. The Christian matrix; 4. The polity of modernity; Part III. Churches and the Struggle for Democracy: 5. Civil rights and liberation in the Americas; 6. The post-colonial struggle for democracy in sub-Saharan Africa; 7. Midwives of democracy in East Germany and South Africa; Part IV. Critical Theological Reflection: 8. A theology for a just democratic world order.

From Our Editors

In this important study John de Gruchy examines the historic and contemporary roles of Christianity in the development of democracy. Distinguishing between, yet relating, democracy to the prophetic vision of a just society, he traces the gestation of modern democracy in medieval Christendom, and then describes the virtual breakdown of the relationship as democracy becomes the polity of modernity.

Editorial Reviews

"While some might contest de Gruchy's embrace of what amounts to a neo-constantinian position for the church, his straightforward defense of democracy as the best available option for embodying penultimate expressions of God's shalom is a welcome retrieval of the question of Christianity and democracy from the hands of capitalism's court chaplains." Daniel M. Bell, Jr., Journal of Church and State