Christianizing the Roman Empire: (A. D. 100-400)

Paperback | September 10, 1986

byRamsay Macmullen

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How did the early Christian church manage to win its dominant place in the Roman world? In his newest book, an eminent historian of ancient Rome examines this question from a secular-rather than an ecclesiastical-viewpoint. MacMullen's provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of miracle or the opportunity for worldly advantages then simply on a 'rising tide of Christian piety.'

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How did the early Christian church manage to win its dominant place in the Roman world? In his newest book, an eminent historian of ancient Rome examines this question from a secular-rather than an ecclesiastical-viewpoint. MacMullen's provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of mira...

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How did the early Christian church manage to win its dominant place in the Roman world? In his newest book, an eminent historian of ancient Rome examines this question from a secular-rather than an ecclesiastical-viewpoint. MacMullen's provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of mira...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:184 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.61 inPublished:September 10, 1986Publisher:Yale University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300036426

ISBN - 13:9780300036428

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Customer Reviews of Christianizing the Roman Empire: (A. D. 100-400)

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Rated 5 out of 5 by from Christianity in Context In this important work, MacMullen paints a fascinating and provocative portrait of the the unique conditions under which Christianity became the dominant religious movement of the Late Roman Empire. The author's masteful integration of both textual and epigraphic evidence displays just how reluctantly the Roman world was "Christianized" through the late fourth and fifth centuries CE.
Date published: 2001-05-16

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From Our Editors

How did the early Christian church manage to win its dominant place in the Roman world? In his newest book, an eminent historian of ancient Rome examines this question from a secular-rather than an ecclesiastical-viewpoint. MacMullen's provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of miracle or the opportunity for worldly advantages then simply on a 'rising tide of Christian piety.'