Cicero as Evidence: A Historians Companion

Paperback | November 25, 2010

byAndrew Lintott

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Cicero, one of the greatest orators of all time and an important politician at the time of the downfall of the Roman Republic, has left in his writings a first-hand view of the age of Caesar and Pompey. However, readers need to learn how to interpret these writings and, as with any politicianor orator, not to believe too easily what he says. This book is a guide to reading Cicero and a companion to anyone who is prepared to take the long but rewarding journey through his works. It is not in itself a biography, but may help readers to construct their own biographies of Cicero orhistories of his age.

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Cicero, one of the greatest orators of all time and an important politician at the time of the downfall of the Roman Republic, has left in his writings a first-hand view of the age of Caesar and Pompey. However, readers need to learn how to interpret these writings and, as with any politicianor orator, not to believe too easily what he...

Andrew Lintott is Emeritus Fellow at Worcester College, Oxford.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:480 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:November 25, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199599726

ISBN - 13:9780199599721

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Table of Contents

I. Reading Cicero1. Reading Events2. The Texts of the Speeches3. Truth and FictionII. Reading Oratory4. Cicero's Forensic Baptism: The Pro Quinctio5. More Problems of Partnership: The Pro Quinto Roscio Comoedo6. Property and Violence: The Pro Tullio and Pro Caecina7. The Citadel of the Allies8. The Defence of Good Men: The Other Side of the Quaestio de Repetundis9. Treason and Other Crimes against the Roman PeopleIII. History in Speeches and Letters10. Candidature and Consulship11. The Aftermath of the Consulship12. The Gang of Three and Clodius13. After the ReturnIV. History and Ideas14. The Search for Otium15. The Governor and the Approach of Civil War16. The Mediator and the Partisans17. Living with Dictatorship18. The Ides of March and After19. Answering the Republic's Call20. Epilogue