Ciceros Philosophy of History by Matthew FoxCiceros Philosophy of History by Matthew Fox

Ciceros Philosophy of History

byMatthew Fox

Hardcover | September 27, 2007

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Cicero has long been seen to embody the values of the Roman republic. This provocative study of Cicero's use of history reveals that rather than promoting his own values, Cicero uses historical representation to explore the difficulties of finding any ideological coherence in Rome's politicalor cultural traditions. Matthew Fox looks to the scepticism of Cicero's philosophical education for an understanding of his perspective on Rome's history, and argues that neglect of the sceptical tradition has transformed the doubting, ambiguous Cicero into the confident proponent of Roman values.Through close reading of a range of his theoretical works, Fox uncovers an ironic attitude towards Roman history, and connects that to the use of irony in mainstream Latin historians. He concludes with a study of a little-known treatise on Cicero from the early eighteenth century which shedsconsiderable light on the history of Cicero's reception.
Matthew Fox is Senior Lecturer in Classics, University of Birmingham.
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Title:Ciceros Philosophy of HistoryFormat:HardcoverDimensions:380 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.06 inPublished:September 27, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199211922

ISBN - 13:9780199211920

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. Struggle, Compensation, and Argument in Cicero's Philosophy3. Reading and Reception4. Literature, History, and Philosophy: The Example of `De re publica'5. History with Rhetoric, Rhetoric with History: `De oratore' and `De legibus'6. History and Memory7. Brutus8. Divination, History, and Superstition9. Ironic History in the Roman Tradition10. Cicero from Enlightenment to Idealism11. Conclusions