Cities of Alexander the Great by P. M. FraserCities of Alexander the Great by P. M. Fraser

Cities of Alexander the Great

byP. M. Fraser

Hardcover | May 1, 1993

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The cities founded by Alexander the Great are an essential part of his overall achievements. The problems concerning them, however, are many - and some incapable of solution. This book is the first to unravel thoroughly the tradition, explaining how it originated in a tendentious politicalpamphlet of the third century BC, which in turn originated in Ptolemaic Alexandria in the context of the development of the earliest version of the Alexander Romance. The author explores the ramification of this reconstruction from a lost Greek original through to the Persian and Arab tradition,and concludes that the number of cities claiming to be Alexander's as recorded in ancient sources needs to be considerably reduced. The book also includes some more general new considerations regarding Alexander's policies and achievements.
P. M. Fraser is at All Souls College, Oxford.
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Title:Cities of Alexander the GreatFormat:HardcoverDimensions:274 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.91 inPublished:May 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198150067

ISBN - 13:9780198150060

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From Our Editors

The cities founded by Alexander the Great were an essential part of his overall achievement. The problems concerning them, however, are many - and some incapable of solution. This book attempts to unravel the tradition, seeking to demonstrate that it originated in a tendentious political pamphlet of the third century BC, written in Ptolemaic Alexandria in the context of the development of the earliest version of the Alexander-Romance. The author explores the ramifications of this reconstruction from a lost Greek original through to the Persian and Arab traditions, and concludes that the number of cities commonly claimed to have been founded by Alexander needs to be considerably reduced. The book also includes some more general considerations regarding Alexander's policies and intentions.

Editorial Reviews

`Erudite work ... For scholars and advanced students, this is an important contribution to Alexander studies.'Choice