Civil Rights and the Presidency: Race and Gender in American Politics, 1960-1972

Paperback | February 1, 1992

byHugh Davis Graham

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Now abridged for courses, this edition of Hugh D. Graham's groundbreaking history of national policy during the battle for civil rights recreates the intense debates in Congress and the White House that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 banningdiscrimination against minorities and women. Following the implementation of these policies through a thickening maze of federal agencies and court decisions, the text reveals how the classic liberal agenda of non-discrimination evolved into the controversial program of affirmative action,surprisingly enough, under Richard Nixon. Based on extensive, groundbreaking research in the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon presidential archives and special collections of the Library of Congress, Civil Rights and the Presidency will be invaluable for courses in American history, political science,and black and women's studies.

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From Our Editors

Now abridged for courses, Hugh D. Graham's groundbreaking history of national policy during the battle for civil rights re-creates the intense debates in Congress and the White House that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 banning discrimination against minorities and women. Unique in its discussion o...

From the Publisher

Now abridged for courses, this edition of Hugh D. Graham's groundbreaking history of national policy during the battle for civil rights recreates the intense debates in Congress and the White House that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 banningdiscrimination against minorities and women. Following t...

Hugh Davis Graham is at Vanderbilt University.

other books by Hugh Davis Graham

The Uncertain Triumph: Federal Education Policy in the Kennedy and Johnson Years
The Uncertain Triumph: Federal Education Policy in the ...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 9.25 × 6.14 × 0.75 inPublished:February 1, 1992Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195073223

ISBN - 13:9780195073225

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. America in 1960: Blacks and Women on the Eve of Social Revolution2. The Kennedy Presidency and Black Civil Rights, 1960-19623. The Segregated Civil Rights Bills of 1963 for Women and Blacks4. Lyndon Johnson and The Civil Rights Act of 19645. The Watershed of 1965: From the Voting Rights Act to "Black Power"6. The EEOC and the Politics of Gender7. Race, Affirmative Action, and Open Housing, 1965-19688. The Nixon Presidency: Domestic Policy and Divided Government9. The Philadelphia Plan and the Politics of Minority Preference10. The "Color-Blind" Constitution and the Federal Courts11. Women, the Nixon Administration, and the Equal Rights Amendment12. The Consolidation of 197213. The Rights Revolution and The American Administrative StateFurther ReadingGlossary of OrganizationsEndnotes

From Our Editors

Now abridged for courses, Hugh D. Graham's groundbreaking history of national policy during the battle for civil rights re-creates the intense debates in Congress and the White House that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 banning discrimination against minorities and women. Unique in its discussion of both race and gender as the driving forces in the development of civil rights policy, the text follows the implementation of these policies through a thickening maze of federal agencies and court decisions, showing how the classic liberal agenda of non-discrimination evolved into the controversial program of affirmative action.

Editorial Reviews

"The first administrative history of the movement....A major milestone in the study of recent American life and politics"--Library Journal