Clandestine Radio Broadcasting: A Study Of Revolutionary And Counterrevolutionary Electronic Communication by Lawrence C. SoleyClandestine Radio Broadcasting: A Study Of Revolutionary And Counterrevolutionary Electronic Communication by Lawrence C. Soley

Clandestine Radio Broadcasting: A Study Of Revolutionary And Counterrevolutionary Electronic…

byLawrence C. Soley, John C. Nichols

Hardcover | December 1, 1986

Pricing and Purchase Info

$112.05 online 
$124.50 list price save 10%
Earn 560 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

"It is difficult to imagine a subject with more elusive data than this. The source and location of clandestine radio broadcasts are, by definition, secret. White' stations openly identify themselves (such as Radio Free Europe), and gray' stations are purportedly operated by dissident groups within a country, although actually they might be located in another nation; but black' stations transmit broadcasts by one side disguised as broadcasts by another. . . . [This] is an extraordinary book. It belongs in every research library concerned with war and revolution and international communications. A valuable appendix lists known clandestine radio stateions, 1948-1985." Choice "In this ambitious and impressive study two academic specialists in the field of political communication have endeavored to cover the history of such broadcasts from the beginnings in the 1930s through the use of psychological warfare and deception of World War II to the manifold practice of gray' and black' propaganda that had punctuated the conflict of the postwar period." Foreign Affairs
Title:Clandestine Radio Broadcasting: A Study Of Revolutionary And Counterrevolutionary Electronic…Format:HardcoverDimensions:399 pages, 9.56 × 6.44 × 1.3 inPublished:December 1, 1986Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275922596

ISBN - 13:9780275922597

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"It is difficult to imagine a subject with more elusive data than this. The source and location of clandestine radio broadcasts are, by definition, secret. White' stations openly identify themselves (such as Radio Free Europe), and gray' stations are purportedly operated by dissident groups within a country, although actually they might be located in another nation; but black' stations transmit broadcasts by one side disguised as broadcasts by another. Clandestine stations often operate for only days or weeks on an erratic schedule and on various frequencies. ... [This] is an extraordinary book. It belongs in every research library concerned with war and revolution and international communications. A valuable appendix lists known clandestine radio stations, 1948-1985."-Choice