Class

Paperback | April 1, 1995

EditorPatrick Joyce

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In recent years, the concept of class has come under increasing scrutiny, as a means of explaining both the present and the past. The post-industrial class has superceded the manual working class, and new forms of industrial management have broken up more traditional hierarchies and outlooks.Furthermore, feminism has now brought into question the whole concept of a class identity. Can class viably explain the present? Did it ever provide an adequate explanation of the past? How did concepts of class develop? What is the language of class? A variety of writings are drawn upon here to suggest answers to these questions, to provide a balanced survey of thought on class,from Marx and Weber to the present day, and to look beyond this towards the very future of class.

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From Our Editors

In recent years, the concept of class has come under increasing scrutiny, as a means of explaining both the present and the past. Economic and social change, together with profound changes in intellectual outlook have called into question the utility of the class concept. Furthermore, feminism has led us to reconsider the whole notion ...

From the Publisher

In recent years, the concept of class has come under increasing scrutiny, as a means of explaining both the present and the past. The post-industrial class has superceded the manual working class, and new forms of industrial management have broken up more traditional hierarchies and outlooks.Furthermore, feminism has now brought into q...

From the Jacket

In recent years, the concept of class has come under increasing scrutiny, as a means of explaining both the present and the past. Economic and social change, together with profound changes in intellectual outlook have called into question the utility of the class concept. Furthermore, feminism has led us to reconsider the whole notion ...

Patrick Joyce is Lecturer in History at the University of Manchester.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:484 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.83 inPublished:April 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192892525

ISBN - 13:9780192892522

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Table of Contents

A. The Classical Inheritance and its Development1. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels on Class2. Max Weber on Class3. Ferdinand Toennies on Estates and Classes4. Rosemary Crompton: The Development of Classical Inheritance5. Howard Newby et al: An Inheritance Reaffirmed: Weber6. Ellen Meiksins Wood: An Inheritance Reaffirmed: MarxB. An Inheritance in Question(a) Positions7. Zygmunt Bauman: Sociology and Postmodernity8. Alain Touraine: Sociology and the Study of Society(b) Arguments9. Jean Baudrillard: The End of the Social10. Donna Haraway: Fractured Identities11. Pierre Bourdieu: The Reality of Representation and the Representation of Reality12. John B. Thompson: Bourdieu on `Habitus'13. John B. Thompson: Giddens on `Structuration'14. Anthony Giddens: The Concept of Structure15. Wes Sharrock and Rod Watson: The Incarnation of Social Structure16. John B. Thompson: Cartoriadis on the Imaginary Institution of Society17. Cornelius Castoriadis: The Social ImaginaryC. Class and the Historians(a) Culture and Structure: Social History Orthodoxy18. E.P. Thompson: The Making of Class19. E.P. Thompson: Class and Class Struggle20. Ira Katznelson: Levels of Class Formation(b) The `Linguistic Turn'21. Gareth Stedman Jones: Class, `Experience', and Politics22. Joan W. Scott: Language, Gender, and Working-Class History23. Patrick Joyce: A People and a Class24. Donald Reid: Ranciere and the Worker25. Jacques Ranciere: The Nights of Labor26. William H. Sewell Jr.: A Post-Materialist Rhetoric for Labour HistoryD. The History of the Social27. Geoff Eley: Habermas and the `Public Sphere'28. James Van Horn Melton: `Society' and the `Public Sphere' in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Germany29. Michel Foucault: Governmentality30. Colin Gordon: The Emergence of Liberal Governmentality, I31. Graham Burchell: The Emergence of Liberal Governmentality, II32. Jacques Donzelot: The Mobilization of Society33. Nikolas Rose: Towards a Critical Sociology of Freedom34. Denise Riley: Gendering `the Social'E. The Hermeneutics of the Social: Codes and Categories35. Robert Roberts: The Class Structure of the `Classic Slum'36. Richard Hoggart: `Them' and `Us'37. Bernice Martin: Symbols, Codes and Cultures38. Barrington Moore Jr.: The Social Bases of Obedience and Revolt39. Alain Cottereau: `Rebelling against the Work we Love'40. Peter Burke: The Language of Orders in Early Modern Europe41. Martin J. Weiner: The Failure of the Bourgeoisie42. Leonore Davidoff and Catherine Hall: Gender and the Middle Class43. R.J. Morris: The Making of the British Middle Class: An Elite-Led Class44. Patrick Joyce: Narratives of Class45. William H. Sewell Jr.: Meanings of Class46. Bernard Waites: War and the Language of Class47. Ross McKibbin: The State and the Language of Class

From Our Editors

In recent years, the concept of class has come under increasing scrutiny, as a means of explaining both the present and the past. Economic and social change, together with profound changes in intellectual outlook have called into question the utility of the class concept. Furthermore, feminism has led us to reconsider the whole notion of class identity. Can class viably explain the present? Did it ever provide an adequate explanation of the past? How did concepts of class develop? What is the language of class? A variety of writings are drawn upon here to suggest answers to these questions, to provide a balanced survey of thought on class, from Marx and Weber to the postmodern thought of the present day, and to look beyond this towards the very future of the idea of class.

Editorial Reviews

`The collection offers a valuable insight into the problems and an interesting choice of views on the various facets of class.'the Journal of Indo-European Studies