Classical Myth and Psychoanalysis: Ancient and Modern Stories of the Self

Hardcover | September 8, 2013

EditorVanda Zajko, Ellen OGorman

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Since Freud published the Interpretation of Dreams in 1900 and utilized Sophocles' Oedipus Rex to work through his developing ideas about the psycho-sexual development of children, it has been virtually impossible to think about psychoanalysis without reference to classical myth. Myth has thecapacity to transcend the context of any particular retelling, continuing to transform our understanding of the present. Throughout the twentieth century, experts on the ancient world have turned to the insights of psychoanalytic criticism to supplement and inform their readings of classical mythand literature. This volume examines the inter-relationship of classical myth and psychoanalysis from the generation before Freud to the present day, engaging with debates about the role of classical myth in modernity, the importance of psychoanalytic ideas for cultural critique, and its ongoing relevance to waysof conceiving the self. The chapters trace the historical roots of terms in everyday usage, such as narcissism and the phallic symbol, in the reception of Classical Greece, and cover a variety of both classical and psychoanalytic texts.

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Since Freud published the Interpretation of Dreams in 1900 and utilized Sophocles' Oedipus Rex to work through his developing ideas about the psycho-sexual development of children, it has been virtually impossible to think about psychoanalysis without reference to classical myth. Myth has thecapacity to transcend the context of any par...

Vanda Zajko is Senior Lecturer in Classics at the University of Bristol. She has wide-ranging research interests in the reception of classical literature, particularly in the 20th century, and in mythology, psychoanalytic theory, and feminist thought. She has published on a variety of ancient authors including Homer, Aeschylus, and Ovi...

other books by Vanda Zajko

Format:HardcoverDimensions:408 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.98 inPublished:September 8, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199656673

ISBN - 13:9780199656677

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Table of Contents

List of contributorsNote on the referencing of Freud's worksIntroduction1. Vanda Zajko and Ellen O Gorman: Myths and their Receptions: Narrative, Antiquity, and the UnconsciousI. Contexts For Freud2. Bruce King: Freud's Empedocles: The Future of a Dualism3. Daniel Orrells: Freud's Phallic Symbol4. Richard Armstrong: Myth, Religion, Illusion: How Freud Got His Fire Back5. David Engels: Narcissism against Narcissus? A Classical Myth and its Influence on the Elaboration of Early Psychoanalysis from Binet to Jung6. Vered Lev Kenaan: Who cares whether Pandora had a large pithos or a small pyxis? Jane Harrison and the emergence of a dynamic conception of the unconsciousII. Freud and Vergil7. Gregory Staley: Freud's Vergil8. Jeff Rodman: Juno and the Symptom9. Ika Willis: Tu Marcellus Eris: Nachtraglichkei in Aeneid 6III. Beyond the Canon10. Victoria Wohl: The Mythic Foundation of Law11. Kurt Lampe: Obeying Your Father: Stoic Theology between Myth and Masochism12. Erik Gunderson: Valerius Maximus and the hysteria of virtue13. Paul Allen Miller: Mythology and the Abject in Imperial SatireIV. Myth as Narrative and Icon14. Meg Harris Williams: Playing with Fire: Prometheus and the Mythological Consciousness15. Oliver Harris: The Ethics of Metamorphosis or A Poet Between Two Deaths16. Jens De Vleminck: In the beginning was the Deed: On Oedipus and Cain17. Marcia Dobson and John Riker: Aristophanes Myth of Eros and Contemporary Psychologies of the SelfV. Reflexivity and Meta-Narrative18. Mark Payne: Aristotle on Poets as Parents and the Hellenistic Poet as Mother19. Page Dubois: Listening, Counter-Transference, and the Classicist as Subject-Supposed-to-KnowBibliographyIndex