Classics Transformed: Schools, Universities, and Society in England, 1830-1960

Hardcover | January 1, 1998

byChristopher Stray

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The first book to give a general account of the transformation of classics in English schools and universities from being the amateur knowledge of the Victorian gentleman to that of the professional scholar, from an elite social marker to a marginalized academic subject. The challenges to theauthority of classics in 19th-century England are analysed, as is the wide range of ideological responses by its practitioners. The impact of university reform on the content and organization of classical knowledge is described in detail, with special reference to Cambridge. Chapters are devotedto the effects of state intervention, social snobbery and democracy on the provision of classics in schools, and the dissensions within the bodies set up to defend it. The narrative is carried through to the abolition of Compulsory Latin in 1960 and the absence of classics from the NationalCurriculum in 1988.

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The first book to give a general account of the transformation of classics in English schools and universities from being the amateur knowledge of the Victorian gentleman to that of the professional scholar, from an elite social marker to a marginalized academic subject. The challenges to theauthority of classics in 19th-century Engla...

Christopher Stray is at Wolfson College, Cambridge.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:350 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.06 inPublished:January 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019815013X

ISBN - 13:9780198150138

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`Classics Transformed is... not a dull work, and more in the same field will be welcome. S.'s most instructive pages are those concerned with the class-background and education of the leading men of the Education Office and its successor, the Board of Education.'H.D. Jocelyn. Journal of Roman Studies LXXXIX 1999.