Codebreakers: The Inside Story of Bletchley Park

Paperback | May 1, 2001

EditorF. H. Hinsley, Alan Stripp

not yet rated|write a review
With many colourful anecdotes and vivid descriptions, this is the first authentic account of daily life at Government Communications Headquarters, Bletchley Park, the most successful intelligence agency in history. Described by Churchill as the 'secret weapon' that 'won the war', the men andwomen of Bletchley Park here combine to write their story in full.This book gives fascinating insights into recruitment and training, together with a full and accurate account of codes and ciphers and how they are broken.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$17.13

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

With many colourful anecdotes and vivid descriptions, this is the first authentic account of daily life at Government Communications Headquarters, Bletchley Park, the most successful intelligence agency in history. Described by Churchill as the 'secret weapon' that 'won the war', the men andwomen of Bletchley Park here combine to write...

Sir Harry Hinsley was formerly Master of St John's College and Professor of the History of International Relations in the University of Cambridge. Alan Stripp is Director of Cambridge University Summer Schools on British Secret Services

other books by F. H. Hinsley

A Peculiar Collection
A Peculiar Collection

Kobo ebook|Jan 31 2014

$0.00

Decisions For War, 1914
Decisions For War, 1914

Kobo ebook|Apr 29 2016

$60.30

see all books by F. H. Hinsley
Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 0.75 inPublished:May 1, 2001Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192801325

ISBN - 13:9780192801326

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Codebreakers: The Inside Story of Bletchley Park

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction. The Influence of Ultra in the Second World WarF.H. Hinsley: Part One. The Production of Ultra Intelligence1. William Millward: Life in and out of Hut 32. Ralph Bennett: The Duty Officer, Hut 33. Edward Thomas: A naval officer in Hut 34. Alex Dakin: The Z Watch in Hut 4, Part I5. Walter Eytan: The Z Watch in Hut 4, Part 26. Patrick Wilkinson: Italian naval decrypts7. Vivienne Alford: Naval Section VI8. Telford Taylor: Anglo-American signals intelligence co-operation9. Robert M. Slusser: An American at Bletchley Park10. F.H. Hinsley: Bletchley Park, the Admiralty, and naval EnigmaPart Two. Enigma11 11. Alan Stripp: The Enigma Machine12. Stuart Milner-Barry: Hut 6: Early Days13. Derek Taunt: Hut 6: 1941-194514. Joan Murray: Hut 8 and naval Enigma, Part 115. Rolf Noskwith: Hut 8 and naval Enigma, Part 216. Peter Twinn: The Abwehr Enigma17. Diana Payne: The bombesPart Three. Fish18. F.H. Hinsley: An Introduction to Fish19. Jack Good: Enigma and Fish20. Ken Halton: The Tunny Machine21. Operation TunnyPart Four. Field ciphers and tactical codes22. Henry Dryden: Recollections of Bletchley Park, France, and Cairo23. Noel Currer-Briggs: Army Ultra's Poor Relations24. Christopher Morris: Navy Ultra Poor Relations25. Peter Gray Lucas: Tactical signals of the German AirforcePart Five. Japanese codes26. Michael Loewe: Japanese naval codes27. Hugh Denham: Bedford-Bletchley-Kilindini-Colombo28. Maurice Wiles: Japanese military codes29. Alan Stripp: Japanese Army Air Force codes at Bletchley Park and Delhi30. Carmen Blacker: Recollections of temps perdu at Bletchley ParkAppendix. How the Bletchly Park buildings took shapeBob Watson:

Editorial Reviews

`What makes Codebreakers so absorbing is that it has been written by the men and women who worked at Bletchley Park, all of whom were forbidden to talk about their work at the time. Codebreakers gives a fascinating insight into their daily lives.'Madeleine Burton, Hitchin Gazette