Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind

Paperback | October 14, 2010

byRobert D. Rupert

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Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind surveys philosophical issues raised by the situated movement in cognitive science, that is, the treatment of cognitive phenomena as the joint products of brain, body, and environment. The book focuses primarily on the hypothesis of extended cognition,which asserts that human cognitive processes literally comprise elements beyond the boundary of the human organism. Rupert argues that the only plausible way in which to demarcate cognitions is systems-based: cognitive states or processes are the states of the integrated set of mechanisms andcapacities that contribute causally and distinctively to the production of cognitive phenomena - for example, language-use, memory, decision-making, theory construction, and, more importantly, the associated forms of behavior. Rupert argues that this integrated system is most likely to appear withinthe boundaries of the human organism. He argues that the systems-based view explains the existing successes of cognitive psychology and cognate fields in a way that extended conceptions of cognition do not, and that once the systems-based view has been adopted, it is especially clear how extantarguments in support of the extended view go wrong. Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind also examines further aspects of the situated program in cognitive science, including the embedded and embodied approaches to cognition. Rupert asks to what extent the plausible incarnations of these situated views depart from orthodox, computational cognitivescience. Here, Rupert focuses on the notions of representation and computation, arguing that the embedded and embodied views do not constitute the radical shifts in perspective they are often claimed to be. Rupert also argues that, properly understood, the embodied view does not offer a new role forthe body, different in principle from the one presupposed by orthodox cognitive science.

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Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind surveys philosophical issues raised by the situated movement in cognitive science, that is, the treatment of cognitive phenomena as the joint products of brain, body, and environment. The book focuses primarily on the hypothesis of extended cognition,which asserts that human cognitive processes l...

Robert D. Rupert is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:October 14, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199767599

ISBN - 13:9780199767595

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Table of Contents

Preface1. Introduction: The Mind, the Computer, and the AlternativesPart I: The Thinking Organism2. Principles of Demarcation3. Cognitive Systems and Demarcation4. Realization and Extended CognitionPart II. Arguments for the Extended View5. Functionalism and Natural Kinds6. Developmental Systems Theory and the Scaffolding of Language7. Dynamical Systems Theory8. The Experience of Extension and the Extension of ExperiencePart III. The Embedded and Embodied Mind9. Embedded Cognition and Computation10. Embedded Cognition and Mental Representation11. The Embodied View12. Summary and ConclusionWorks cited

Editorial Reviews

"Rupert's treatment is a state of the art sustained attack on various forms of the 'extended mind hypothesis'. It is rigorous and challenging, and will be of interest to a quite a large audience of researchers (graduates and above) in philosophy and in cognitive science. Rupert studiouslyavoids the 'straw men' that populate some recent critiques, and raises deep and sympathetic challenges that go to the core of the program." --Andy Clark, Department of Philosophy, University of Edinburgh