Cold Caller: A White Collar Noir by Jason StarrCold Caller: A White Collar Noir by Jason Starr

Cold Caller: A White Collar Noir

byJason Starr

Paperback | May 5, 1998

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about

Once Bill Moss was a rising VP at a topflight ad agency, but now he works as a "cold caller" at a telemarketing firm in the Times Square area. He's got a bad case of the urban blues. Still, he's good at his work and (he thinks) about to be promoted, when out of the blue he's fired. So Bill snaps . . . and the next thing he knows he has a dead supervisor on his hands and problems no career counselor can help him with.

In Cold Caller Jason Starr retools the James M. Cain novel of cynical suspense and murder for the fiber-optic age.
Jason Starr is a graduate of SUNY Purchase, a playwright, and a former telemarketer of communications technology. He lives in New York.
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Title:Cold Caller: A White Collar NoirFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.58 inPublished:May 5, 1998Publisher:WW Norton

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393317676

ISBN - 13:9780393317671

Reviews

From Our Editors

A wonderful, readable tale of a downwardly mobile yuppie who'll just "kill" to get ahead. Think Jim Thompson with an MBA. "Tough, dark, elegant. . . . "Cold Caller" is pure '90s noir. Read it!"--Edward Bunker

Editorial Reviews

Just when you thought you'd read enough noir to fill in a particularly desolate night in Tijuana, along comes Jason Starr to give you fresh nightmares. . . . Reminiscent of Patricia Highsmith's Ripley novels, Cold Caller is a bitterly funny tale of a life spiraling madly out of control. . . . Bill Moss is as sympathetic a lying, cheating, murdering scumbag as you could hope to meet. — Crime Time MagazineTough, dark, elegant. . . . Cold Caller is pure '90s noir. Read it! — Edward BunkerCool, deadpan, a rollercoaster ride to hell. — The Guardian