Coleridge, Language And The Sublime: From Transcendence to Finitude by C. StokesColeridge, Language And The Sublime: From Transcendence to Finitude by C. Stokes

Coleridge, Language And The Sublime: From Transcendence to Finitude

byC. Stokes

Hardcover | November 3, 2010

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Traversing the themes of language, terror and representation, this is the first study to engage Coleridge through the sublime, showing him to have a compelling position in an ongoing conversation about finitude. Drawing on close readings of both his poetry and prose, it depicts Coleridge as a thinker of "the limit" with contemporary force.
CHRISTOPHER STOKES has been an Associate Teaching Fellow at the University of Exeter, UK for the last two years.
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Title:Coleridge, Language And The Sublime: From Transcendence to FinitudeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:220 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0 inPublished:November 3, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230278116

ISBN - 13:9780230278110

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
PART I: LANGUAGE, LONGINUS, EMOTION
'Violently Agitated by a Real Passion': Longinus and Coleridge's Effusions 
'The Self-Watching Subtilizing Mind': The Impassioned Self in the 1798 Fears in Solitude Quarto
PART II: TERROR, BURKE, ETHICS
'Cruel Wrongs and Strange Distress': An Ethical Terror-Sublime in 'The Destiny of Nations'
Chapter 4: 'My Soul in Agony': The Terrors of Subjectivity in 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'
PART III: REPRESENTATION, KANT THEOLOGY
'Ye signs and wonders of the element! Utter forth God': Divine Presence and Divine Withdrawal in the Natural Sublime
'What never is but only is to be': The Ontology of the Coleridgean Sublime
PART IV: CONCLUSION
'A Specimen of the Sublime dashed to pieces': Sublimity in the Biographia Literaria and the Limbo constellation
Endnotes
Bibliography

Editorial Reviews

"Christopher Stokes finds in Coleridge's dealings with the sublime a way into the patterns of his thinking, as they are articulated both in his poetry and in his philosophy. It is an impressive, ranging, perceptive account: the book takes on a subject that we thought we knew all about and discovers something new to say about it." --Seamus Perry, Balliol College, Oxford University, UK