Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed: Revised Edition by Jared Diamond

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed: Revised Edition

byJared Diamond

Kobo ebook | January 4, 2011

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In Jared Diamond’s follow-up to the Pulitzer-Prize winning Guns, Germs and Steel, the author explores how climate change, the population explosion and political discord create the conditions for the collapse of civilization

Environmental damage, climate change, globalization, rapid population growth, and unwise political choices were all factors in the demise of societies around the world, but some found solutions and persisted. As in Guns, Germs, and Steel, Diamond traces the fundamental pattern of catastrophe, and weaves an all-encompassing global thesis through a series of fascinating historical-cultural narratives. Collapse moves from the Polynesian cultures on Easter Island to the flourishing American civilizations of the Anasazi and the Maya and finally to the doomed Viking colony on Greenland. Similar problems face us today and have already brought disaster to Rwanda and Haiti, even as China and Australia are trying to cope in innovative ways. Despite our own society’s apparently inexhaustible wealth and unrivaled political power, ominous warning signs have begun to emerge even in ecologically robust areas like Montana.

Brilliant, illuminating, and immensely absorbing, Collapse is destined to take its place as one of the essential books of our time, raising the urgent question: How can our world best avoid committing ecological suicide?

Title:Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed: Revised EditionFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:January 4, 2011Publisher:Penguin Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1101502002

ISBN - 13:9781101502006

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from We can do better When I started this book, I never thought it would touch me as a gardener and a pescatarian. I am now more determine to protect the soil and trees in my care. Fish and seafood are only from sustainable sources. Started composting nearly 30 years ago. I also believe in science.
Date published: 2018-12-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love Diamond's titles Fantastic book, and if you haven't read 'Guns, Germs and Steel', do so as well. I have yet to read the new afterword, but the book's forte is Diamond's unparalleled observations of historical societies, well learned during his time in Papua New Guinea. A whole new breed of book, and an excellent one at that.
Date published: 2018-01-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting The best thing I can say is that the subject matter is really interesting, I just didn't find it to be a pleasant read. It's just hella dry and that's saying something considering that it was part of other, equally dry academic reading. The overarching themes in the book are really important and relevant, just overall not fun to slog through. I recommend it for the subject matter, less for the ease of the read.
Date published: 2017-05-30
Rated 3 out of 5 by from alright not as good as guns germs and steel
Date published: 2016-12-27

From the Author

In Jared Diamond’s follow-up to the Pulitzer-Prize winning Guns, Germs and Steel, the author explores how climate change, the population explosion and political discord create the conditions for the collapse of civilization. Diamond is also the author of Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in CrisisEnvironmental damage, climate change, globalization, rapid population growth, and unwise political choices were all factors in the demise of societies around the world, but some found solutions and persisted. As in Guns, Germs, and Steel, Diamond traces the fundamental pattern of catastrophe, and weaves an all-encompassing global thesis through a series of fascinating historical-cultural narratives. Collapse moves from the Polynesian cultures on Easter Island to the flourishing American civilizations of the Anasazi and the Maya and finally to the doomed Viking colony on Greenland. Similar problems face us today and have already brought disaster to Rwanda and Haiti, even as China and Australia are trying to cope in innovative ways. Despite our own society’s apparently inexhaustible wealth and unrivaled political power, ominous warning signs have begun to emerge even in ecologically robust areas like Montana.Brilliant, illuminating, and immensely absorbing, Collapse is destined to take its place as one of the essential books of our time, raising the urgent question: How can our world best avoid committing ecological suicide?