Colonial Georgia: A Study in British Imperial Policy In the Eighteenth Century by Trevor R. ReeseColonial Georgia: A Study in British Imperial Policy In the Eighteenth Century by Trevor R. Reese

Colonial Georgia: A Study in British Imperial Policy In the Eighteenth Century

byTrevor R. Reese

Paperback | April 1, 2010

Pricing and Purchase Info

$30.02

Earn 150 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

First published in 1963, this study examines the colony of Georgia's first thirty-five years from the perspective of the British Empire. Being the last of the thirteen colonies, Georgia is well suited for a study on imperial administration because Britain had over a century of experience dealing with the other colonies at the time of its founding. This work explores British motives behind the founding of Georgia, Indian relations from the context of European wars, diplomacy, politics, and economic development. Trevor R. Reese presents the early history and settlement of Georgia as a clear example of the objects, methods, and failings of the old colonial system of the British Empire.
Trevor R. Reese taught at Newcastle University College, the University of Sydney, the University of Hull, and the University of London. He served as editor of the journal Imperial Studies and is the author of numerous works including The History of the Royal Commonwealth Society, 1868-1968 and Australia, New Zealand, and the United Sta...
Loading
Title:Colonial Georgia: A Study in British Imperial Policy In the Eighteenth CenturyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:180 pages, 9.05 × 6 × 0.47 inPublished:April 1, 2010Publisher:University Of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820335533

ISBN - 13:9780820335537

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"A judicious assessment of generally familiar materials . . . the author re-examines standard sources to produce explanations more plausible than those of most of his predecessors."-Journal of American History