Colour Vision Deficiencies X: Proceedings of the tenth Symposium of the International Research Group on Colour Vision Deficiencie by B. DrumColour Vision Deficiencies X: Proceedings of the tenth Symposium of the International Research Group on Colour Vision Deficiencie by B. Drum

Colour Vision Deficiencies X: Proceedings of the tenth Symposium of the International Research…

byB. DrumEditorJ.D. Moreland, A. Serra

Paperback | November 5, 2012

Pricing and Purchase Info

$689.95

Earn 3,450 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Since its inception, the International Research Group on Colour Vision Deficiencies (IRGCVD) has followed the policy that the Symposium Pro­ ceedings should be as close as possible to a complete record of the scientific content of the meeting. This policy has the advantage of providing an accurate picture of the current state of the art in research on color vision deficiencies, but it also has the disadvantage that papers typically span a wide range of quality. In this volume, however, we have instituted a system of peer review in an effort to enhance scientific quality as much as possible while continuing our past policy of publishing all submitted manuscripts. In addition to being edited for English composition and grammar, each of the papers included here has been carefully reviewed by an IRGCVD member selected for his or her expertise in the specific topic of the paper. Reviewers were instructed to include in their comments suggestions for improvement rather than recom­ or rejection. In our opinion, this review process mendations for publication has resulted in substantial improvement of many of the articles and has enhanced the value of the publication. We are pleased to acknowledge the efforts of our reviewers and offer them our sincere thanks for their important contributions to Colour Vision Deficiencies X. The Editors B. Drum, J. D. Moreland & A. Serra (eds. ), Colour Vision Deficiencies X, p. xiii.
Title:Colour Vision Deficiencies X: Proceedings of the tenth Symposium of the International Research…Format:PaperbackDimensions:644 pages, 23.5 × 15.5 × 0.01 inPublished:November 5, 2012Publisher:Springer NatureLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9401056803

ISBN - 13:9789401056809

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

One. Stimulus Field Size Effects in Colour Vision.- 1. Y. Ohta (Invited Paper): Tokyo, Japan Change in color vision for prototype anomaloscope with a visual field of 2° to 20°.- 2. W. Jaeger, H. Krastel and G. Marat: Heidelberg, West Germany Large field spectral matches in dichromats.- 3. A. Iivanainen and J. Rovamo: Helsinki, Finland The effect of stimulus size on the detection of chromatic deviations from white and yellow across the human visual field.- 4. V.J. Honson and S.J. Dain: Kensington, Australia The effects of size and analysis method on the performance of the Farnsworth-Munsell D-15 test.- 5. K. Knoblauch, M. Fischer, N. Robillard, I.S. Grunwald and E. Faye: New York, NY, U.S.A. The effect of test element size on performance of the D-15 in age-related maculopathy and congenital color deficiency.- 6. H. Plendl, W. Paulus and S. Krafczyk: Munich, West Germany Effect of field size on the colour evoked potentials and the electroretinogram.- 7. J.J. Kulikowski, I.J. Murray and M.H.A. Russell: Manchester, U.K. Effect of stimulus size on chromatic and achromatic VEPs.- Two. New Colour Vision Tests, Examination Methods and Data Analyses.- 8. J.D. Mollon, S. Astell and J.P. Reffin: Cambridge, U.K. A minimalist test of colour vision.- 9. J.P. Reffin, S. Astell and J.D. Mollon: Cambridge, U.K. Trials of a computer-controlled colour vision test that preserves the advantages of pseudoisochromatic plates.- 10. B. Drum, C. Sternheim and M. Severns: Baltimore, College Park and Gaithersburg, MD, U.S.A. Anomaloscope plate test field trial: comparisons with four other tests of congenital red-green color vision deficiencies.- 11. J.K. Hovis and H. Dolman: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Estimating chromatic thresholds.- 12. G. Derefeldt, C-E. Hedin, K-O. Skoog and G. Verriest: Linköping, Sweden and Ghent, Belgium A VDU colour vision test for congenital colour vision deficiencies.- 13. G. Verriest, F.E. Sucs and A. Uvijls: Ghent and Brussels, Belgium Spectral and flicker sensitivity functions with a fibre optic non-Maxwellian view system.- 14. R. Fletcher; London, U.K. and Kongsberg Inginor Hogskole, Norway A modified lantern test.- 15. M. Aguilar, M.L.F. de Mattiello and D. Ribas: Buenos Aires, Argentina Fusion chromatic and temporal frequencies in normal and anomalous observers.- 16. M.L.F. de Mattiello and A. Gonella: Buenos Aires, Argentina A clinical evaluation of the lightness and contrast vision tests.- 17. S.J. Dain and A.J. Adams: Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. and New South Wales, Australia Evaluation of the Adams desaturated D-15 test with congenital color vision defects.- 18. H. Krastel, H. Gehrung, K. Dax and K. Rohrschneider: Heidelberg, West Germany Clinical application of the Heidelberg anomaloscope.- 19. M. Pelizzone, J. Sommerhalder, A. Roth and D. Hermès: Geneva, Switzerland Automated Rayleigh and Moreland matches on a computer-controlled anomaloscope.- 20. M. Marré, E. Marré and T. Eckardt: Dresden, East Germany Evaluation of the SPP-II test.- 21. J.A.M. van Everdingen, V.C. Smith and J. Pokorny: Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Sensitivity of tritan screening tests as evaluated in normals at reduced levels of illumination.- 22. V.C. Smith, J.A.M. van Everdingen and J. Pokorny; Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Sensitivity of arrangement tests as evaluated in normals at reduced levels of illumination.- 23. S.J. Dain, M.O. Scase and D.H. Foster: Keele, Staffordshire, U.K. An assessment of the 'mesopization' model of blue-yellow colour vision defects.- 24. P. Grützner, H. Krastel and C. Seybold: Darmstadt and Heidelberg, West Germany Validation of pseudo-isochromatic plates by chromatic acuity.- 25. K. Hamano, T. Motohashi, H. Kudo and Y. Ohta: Tokyo, Japan Study of congenital color defects using the D&H color rule.- 26. K. Kitahara, T. Okabe, K. Mihara and A. Kandatsu: Tokyo, Japan Theoretical patterns of the panel D-15 test in congenital red-green dichromats.- 27. T. Okabe, A. Kandatsu, J. Noji and K. Kitahara: Tokyo, Japan The use of the panel D-15 test in estimating the convergence point for deuteranopia.- 28. T. Steinschneider and O. Polotsky: Jerusalem, Israel Combined computer program for the Farnsworth D-15 and Roth 28-hue tests.- 29. M. Marré, E. Marré, P. Mierdel and T. Eckardt: Dresden, East Germany Computerized assessment of the FM 100-hue test in acquired color vision defects.- 30. O. Lagerlöf: Stockholm, Sweden The Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test in clinical practice.- 31. F. Zisman, K.R. Zisman and M.G. Harris: Berkeley and Hercules, CA, U.S.A. Utility and transmissions of therapeutically tinted contact lenses.- 32. G. de'Gennaro, A. Senese and M. Vitale: Napoli, Italy Orientation and selection of professions using computerized colour tests.- 33. J. Leid: Pau, France Clinical perspectives in colour.- Three. Normal Colour Vision.- 34. J. Birch, A. Young and S. David: London, U.K. Variations in normal trichromatism.- 35. RA. Humanski and S.K. Shevell; Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Factors contributing to differences in Rayleigh matches of normal trichromats.- 36. W. Verdon and G. Haegerstrom-Portnoy: Berkeley, CA. U.S.A. Chromatic properties of dichoptic Westheimer functions.- 37. M.L.F. de Mattiello and J. Perez Carpinell: Buenos Aires, Argentina and Valencia, Spain Retinal and cortical sensitivity to different chromatic stimuli.- 38. S.L. Buck, K. Bonnelle, P. Zohn and R. Knight: Seattle, WA, U.S.A. Size and sensitivity scaling of ?4 and ?5.- 39. T. Knottenberg and H. Scheibner: Düsseldorf, West Germany Approaching the Abney effect within linear opponent-color vision.- 40. H. Krastel, W. Jaeger, S. Zimmermann, B. Heckmann and M. Krystek: Heidelberg and Braunschweig, West Germany Systematics of human photopic spectral sensitivity.- 41. M.A. Crognale, G.H. Jacobs and J. Neitz: Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A. Flicker photometric ERG measurements of short wavelength sensitive cones.- 42. J.D. Moreland, E. Torczynski and R. Tripathi: Bradford, U.K. and Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Rayleigh and Moreland matches in the ageing eye.- 43. A. Roth, M. Pelizzone, J. Sommerhalder, D. Hermès and F. Simona: Geneva, Switzerland The two equation method. III. Results in normal subjects above 50 years of age. Correlation with lens opacity.- 44. P. Gouras: New York, NY, U.S.A. Modeling chromatic contrast detectors in the primate visual system.- Four. Congenital Colour Vision Deficiencies.- 45. M. Müller, C.R. Cavonius and J.D. Mollon: Dortmund, West Germany and Cambridge, U.K. Constructing the color space of the deuteranomalous observer.- 46. T. Kremer and H. Scheibner: Düsseldorf, West Germany Deuteranomalous opponent-colour vision including the Abney effect.- 47. M. Neitz, J. Neitz and G.H. Jacobs: Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A. Relationship between cone pigments and genes in deuteranomalous subjects.- 48. G.H. Jacobs and J. Neitz: Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A. Deuteranope spectral sensitivity measured with ERG flicker photometry.- 49. F. Viénot and A. Chiron: Paris, France Mesopic luminous matches of protanopic and deuteranopic observers.- 50. A. Roth, F. Paccolat, D. Hermès, M. Pelizzone, D. Klein, R. Feil and J.-L. Mandel: Geneva, Switzerland and Strasbourg, France Five generations of a protan+deutan family: genealogy, color vision and genomic DNA.- 51. P.G. Gallo and M.P. Nardella: Padua, Italy Colour vision deficiencies in secondary school students in Italy.- 52. M.O. Scase, D.H. Foster, W.P. Honan and J.R. Heron: Keele and Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, U.K. A case of unilateral blue colour vision loss..- 53. L.N. Went, J.A. Oosterhuis and M. van Schooneveld: Leiden and Amsterdam, The Netherlands A large family with a dominant cone dystrophy revealing prodromally a severe tritan defect.- 54. W.H. Swanson: Dallas, TX, U.S.A. Heterochromatic modulation photometry in heterozygous carriers of congenital color defects.- 55. M. Fossarello, S. Solarino, I. Zucca, M. Piscitelli, M. Piu, A. Piras and A. Serra: Cagliari, Italy Colour discrimination in congenital stationary night blindness.- 56. A. Serra, M. Fossarello, I. Zucca, G. Puxeddu, C.M. Dessy, A. Pitzus and C. Palmas: Cagliari, Italy Genetic study of Sardinian families with G6PD deficiency and colour vision defects.- Five. Acquired Colour Vision Deficiencies: Retinitis Pigmentosa and Diabetes Mellitus.- 57. G. Verriest, F.E. Sues and A. Uvijls: Ghent and Brussels, Belgium Spectral and flicker sensitivity functions in retinitis pigmentosa with a fibre optic non-Maxwellian view system.- 58. A. Serra, I. Zucca, M. D'Atri, M. Piscitelli, M. Piu, A. Mulas and G. Puxeddu: Cagliari, Italy Visual function implications of tinted glasses in patients affected by retinitis pigmentosa.- 59. M. Fossarello, I. Zucca, M. Piscitelli, S. Mulas, A. Mulas, C.M. Dessy, A. Campurra and A. Serra: Cagliari, Italy The effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on colour discrimination and fluorescein angiography in edematous maculopathies.- 60. J. Birch, A.E. Ariffin and A. Kurtz: London, U.K. Colour vision screening for the detection of diabetic retinopathy.- 61. R. Fletcher: London, U.K. Colour perception warning for self-testing diabetics.- 62. O. Lagerlöf: Stockholm, Sweden Color vision in diabetics.- 63. M. Mäntyjärvi: Kuopio, Finland Nagel anomaloscope findings in diabetic school children.- 64. A.E. Ariffin, J. Birch, P.J. Polkinghorne and C.R. Canning: London, U.K. Colour vision changes following pan-retinal photocoagulation with the dye laser.- Six. Acquired Colour Vision Deficiencies: Optic Nerve Disorders.- 65. A.J. Adams, C.A. Johnson and R.A. Lewis: Berkeley and Davis, CA, U.S.A. S cone pathway sensitivity loss in ocular hypertension and early glaucoma has nerve fiber bundle pattern.- 66. T. Steinschneider and U. Ticho: Jerusalem, Israel Correlation between results of 28-hue test and loss of visual field in glaucoma (preliminary results).- 67. F. Zwas, D.H. Shin and P. McKinnon: Detroit, MI, U.S.A. Early spectral sensitivity changes in unilateral glaucoma.- 68. K. Oyama, K. Kitahara, G. Hisato and R. Tamaki: Tokyo, Japan The characteristics of color vision defects in optic nerve injuries.- 69. W. Paulus and H. Plendl: Munich, West Germany Colour vision defects in optic nerve compression tested with the D&H colour rule.- 70. M.H.A. Russell, I.J. Murray, R.A. Metcalfe and J.J. Kulikowski: Manchester, U.K. Chromatic and achromatic function in multiple sclerosis; VEPs and psychophysics.- Seven. Acquired Colour Vision Deficiencies: Miscellaneous.- 71. H. Zwick, D.O. Robbins, S.B. Reynolds, DJ. Lund, S.T. Schuschereba, R.C. Long and M. Nawim: San Francisco, CA, and Delaware, OH, U.S.A. Effects of small spot foveal exposure on spatial vision and ERG spectral sensitivity.- 72. A. Bayer, E. Zrenner and W. Paulus: Munich and Tübingen, West Germany Colour vision deficiencies induced by the anticonvulsants Phenytoin and carbamazepine.- 73. G. Staurenghi, A. Porta, A. Autelitano, N. Orzalesi, P. Padovese, D. Brancaccio, V. Scaioli, F. Panzica and G. Avanzini: Milan and Como, Italy Ocular effects of desferrioxamine infusion in uraemic patients on chronic haemodialysis.- 74. H. Zwick, B. Burri and E.S. Beatrice: San Francisco, CA, U.S.A. Vitamin A supplementation effects on photopic and scotopic visual function and measures of vitamin A status.- 75. I. Zucca, N. Aste, M. Piscitelli, M. D'Atri, G. Martini, M. Pau and A. Serra: Cagliari, Italy Some remarks on colour discrimination in psoriasis.- 76. R. Fusco, G. Ambrosio, A. Magli and G. Nieto: Naples, Italy Colour vision and contrast sensitivity in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.- Author index.