Communism in Mexico: A Study in Political Frustration

Paperback | March 15, 2011

byKarl M. Schmitt

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The ease with which Cuba slipped into its relationship with Communism revived in the United States its recurring nightmare in which other Latin American countries, particularly Mexico, become satellites of Russia or Red China. But such an occurrence is most unlikely in Mexico, according to Karl Schmitt, former intelligence research analyst with the United States Department of State.

Communism in Mexico traces efforts during the early twentieth century to create a Soviet-style society in one of the largest and most strategically situated of the Latin American countries. Schmitt writes authoritatively of the Mexican Communist movement, tracing its development from an early and potentially powerful political-economic base to the increasingly fragmented and weakened collection of parties and front groups of the 1960s. He follows the various schisms and factional divisions to the mid-1950s, when the process of disintegration became most noticeable, and explores and analyzes in detail Communist attempts since then to establish unity among the many quarreling and frustrated groups of the now-splintered movement.

Three Communist parties in Mexico, a score of front groups, and numerous infiltration cells in non-Communist organizations such as student and labor groups, all recognize in a broad way a common and ultimate goal: the creation of a Soviet-style society. But their attempts at unity have consistently led only to further bickering and frustration. This period is subjected to a thorough study and analysis in an effort to understand and explain the Communists' lack of success. Schmitt presciently concludes that Communism's future in Mexico will be as cloudy as its past, and that the accelerating economy and improving social conditions there will serve to weaken the movement still further.

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The ease with which Cuba slipped into its relationship with Communism revived in the United States its recurring nightmare in which other Latin American countries, particularly Mexico, become satellites of Russia or Red China. But such an occurrence is most unlikely in Mexico, according to Karl Schmitt, former intelligence research ana...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:302 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:March 15, 2011Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292729561

ISBN - 13:9780292729568

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Table of Contents

PrefaceI. The History of the Mexican Communist MovementThe Founding of the Mexican Communist PartyThe First Ten Years, 1919–1929Revolt, Suppression, and Persecution, 1929–1934Revival and Furthest Advance, 1934–1940Discord, Disunity, and Decline of the Communist Movement, 1940–1962 Weaknesses In the Mexican Communist Party Growth of Government Hostility To Communism In Labor Organizations Founding of the Communist-Front People’s Party Founding of the Communist-Splinter Mexican Worker-Peasant Party Cooperation and Competition Among the Three Communist Parties Cárdenas and the National Liberation MovementII. Orthodoxy and Schism in Mexican CommunismThe Mexican Communist Party Leaders and Followers Organization Principles, Programs, and Propaganda ActivitiesThe Mexican Worker-Peasant Party Leaders and Followers Organization Principles, Programs, and Propaganda ActivitiesThe Socialist People’s Party Introduction Leaders and Followers Organization Principles, Programs, and Propaganda ActivitiesIII. Communist-Front Organizations in MexicoIntroductionThe National Liberation MovementThe Mexican Peace CommitteeThe Mexican-Russian Institute of Cultural ExchangeThe Society of Friends of the USSRThe Mexican Society of Friends with People’s ChinaThe Mexican-Czechoslovak Institute of Cultural ExchangeThe Mexican-Rumanian Friendship and Cultural Exchange SocietyThe Mexican-Bulgarian Friendship and Cultural Exchange SocietyThe Mexican-Hungarian Friendship and Cultural Exchange InstituteThe Society of Friends of the People’s Republic of PolandThe Adam Mickiewicz PatronateThe Society of Friends of GuatemalaThe Mexican Society of Friends of Revolutionary GuatemalaThe Society of Friends of CubaThe Mexican-Cuban Institute of Cultural Relations “José Marti,”The Journalist Friends of CubaThe People’s Graphic Arts ShopThe Center of Mexican JournalistsThe People’s Israelite LeagueThe National Front of Plastic ArtsThe Circle of Mexican StudiesThe Democratic Union of Mexican WomenThe Vanguard of Mexican WomenThe Confederation of Mexican YouthsThe National Federation of Technical StudentsIV. Organized Labor and the CommunistsIntroductionCommunist-infiltrated Labor Organizations The Railroad Workers’ Union of the Mexican Republic The Mining and Metallurgical Workers’ Union of the Mexican Republic The Mexican Confederation of Electrical Workers The National Teachers’ UnionCommunist-controlled Labor Organizations The World Federation of Trade Unions The Confederation of Latin American Workers The General Union of Workers and Peasants of Mexico The Central Union of Ejido Societies The Workers’ Front The Workers’ UniversityV. The Mexican Government, the Mexican Communists, and International CommunismIntroductionThe Mexican Government and the CommunistsInternational Communism and the Mexican MovementVI. The Failure of Mexican CommunismPostscriptIntroductionThe Political Parties The PCM The PPS and the POCM The Electoral Front of the PeopleCommunist-Front Organizations in MexicoOrganized Labor and the CommunistsThe Mexican Government and the CommunistsThe Mexican Communists and the International CommunistsBibliographyIndex