Company Towns of the Pacific Northwest

Paperback | July 1, 2003

byLinda Carlson

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2004 Washington State Book Award Finalist

"Company town." The words evoke images of rough-and-tumble loggers and gritty miners, of dreary shacks in isolated villages, of wages paid in scrip good only at price-gouging company stores, of paternalistic employers. But these stereotypes are outdated, especially for those company towns that flourished well into the twentieth century. In Company Towns of the Pacific Northwest, Linda Carlson provides a more balanced and realistic look at these "intentional communities."

Drawing from residents' reminiscences, contemporary newspaper accounts, company newsletters and histories, census and school records, and site plans, Carlson looks at towns in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. She examines how companies went about controlling housing, religion, taxes, liquor, prostitution, and union organizers. This vibrant history gives the details of daily life in communities that were often remote and subject to severe weather. It looks at the tragedies and celebrations: sawmill accidents, mine cave-ins, and avalanches as well as Independence Day picnics, school graduations, and Christmas parties. Finally, it tells what happened when people left--when they lost their jobs, when the family breadwinner died or was disabled, when the mill closed.

An ample selection of illustrations, most never previously published, broadens the appeal of this lively and well-researched book.

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2004 Washington State Book Award Finalist"Company town." The words evoke images of rough-and-tumble loggers and gritty miners, of dreary shacks in isolated villages, of wages paid in scrip good only at price-gouging company stores, of paternalistic employers. But these stereotypes are outdated, especially for those company towns that f...

Linda Carlson has written or contributed to several books on business, including Services Marketing, The Publicity and Promotion Handbook: A Complete Guide for Small Business, and nine job-search guides. A graduate of the Harvard Business School, she has a special interest in company towns and social histories.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 9.1 × 6.1 × 0.68 inPublished:July 1, 2003Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295983329

ISBN - 13:9780295983325

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsWhen the Boss Built the TownBunkhouses, Tent Houses, and Silk Stocking RowWho Lived in Company Towns?When the Dinner Bell ClangedEducation in the Company TownReligion in the Company TownBaseball, Bowling, Bands, and Bridge TournamentsThe Importance of the Company StoreForty Miles from NowhereGetting the News in Company TownsWhen the "Dead Whistle" BlewDepression and World WarsFame -- Even If FleetingThe Paternalistic Company Town BossWhen the Town Shut DownThe Bottom LineGazetteerNotesBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

2004 Washington State Book Award Finalist"Company town." The words evoke images of rough-and-tumble loggers and gritty miners, of dreary shacks in isolated villages, of wages paid in scrip good only at price-gouging company stores, of paternalistic employers. But these stereotypes are outdated, especially for those company towns that flourished well into the twentieth century. In Company Towns of the Pacific Northwest, Linda Carlson provides a more balanced and realistic look at these "intentional communities."Drawing from residents' reminiscences, contemporary newspaper accounts, company newsletters and histories, census and school records, and site plans, Carlson looks at towns in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. She examines how companies went about controlling housing, religion, taxes, liquor, prostitution, and union organizers. This vibrant history gives the details of daily life in communities that were often remote and subject to severe weather. It looks at the tragedies and celebrations: sawmill accidents, mine cave-ins, and avalanches as well as Independence Day picnics, school graduations, and Christmas parties. Finally, it tells what happened when people left--when they lost their jobs, when the family breadwinner died or was disabled, when the mill closed.An ample selection of illustrations, most never previously published, broadens the appeal of this lively and well-researched book.This remarkable survey of life in the company towns of the Pacific Northwest and their significance to the economy of the region makes an important contribution to the social history of the West. Here Carlson identifies over a hundred full-blown company-owned towns, where, in most cases, the company provided all the housing, stores, schools, recreational facilities, law enforcement, and even ministers. Her well-written story reveals paternalism at both its best and its worst. - James B. Allen, author of The Company Town in the American West