Compete Training Journal by Lauren FleshmanCompete Training Journal by Lauren Fleshman

Compete Training Journal

byLauren Fleshman, Roisin Mcgettigan-dumas

Paperback | November 15, 2016

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about

Nothing makes a runner feel quite so alive as the pre-race jitters.Racing is when you find out what works for you and what holds you back, when you find out how you stack up-and where you want to go next.

Whether your next race is a 5K or an ultramarathon, theCompete Training Journalwill transform your approach to competing and make sure that race day brings out the best in you. New racers will get a fast-track road map to racing success while experienced competitors will deepen all aspects of their mental game for even better performances.

Drawing from their two decades of professional racing experience, runners Lauren Fleshman and Roisin McGettigan-Dumas will guide you to:

- Set goals you can achieve.

- Map out the steps to achieve your goals.

- Log your workouts.

- Keep it real-and avoid harmful obsession with outcomes.

- Make racing an expression of your training.

- Set smart race strategies.

- Relax! And train with intention.

- Emphasize the process instead of the goals.

- Avoid comparing yourself to others.

- Get in the zone the week before your race.

- Own your strengths-and root out your weaknesses.

- Build up the mental case to enable success.

- Keep it fun.

- Reflect on your season and consider the next challenge.

Racing should make you sweat in a good way. WithCompete Training Journal, you'll look at competition in a new way and find new reward from the running you love.

Includes space for goal setting, workout log space for two seasons of racing (spring/fall), race plans and reviews, a race calendar, pace charts for 200m to 26.2 mi.

Lauren Fleshman is considered one of the greatest middle-distance runners in American history and one of the most influential women in running.She is a former professional runner, running coach, writer and co-author of five books, and cofounder of Picky Bars, maker of real food performance snacks. On her popular blog,Ask Lauren Fleshma...
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Title:Compete Training JournalFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 7.75 × 6.38 × 0.88 inPublished:November 15, 2016Publisher:VeloPressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1937715612

ISBN - 13:9781937715618

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic Read This is an excellent book. It will open your eyes on different aspects of sports, training and genetics. It touches on how one can practice (10.000 hour rule), how countries select athletes and the differences of how genetics/geography play in performance.
Date published: 2017-12-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Smart and stimulating Factual story telling that keeps you awake until 5am because you can't put the book down. Don't let the title fool you, this book is not just a read for people who are athletic or who enjoy sports. It is an interesting and insightful read for all that I highly recommend.
Date published: 2017-02-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Insightful This is a great book for any sports fan, but really hit me hard was the section on early specialization in youth sports. I know so many parents, myself included, who have pushed their kids into sports early in life and the knowledge shared here really altered my ideas about it. Worth the read.
Date published: 2017-01-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating Look into Sports and Genes! Fascinating look into the nature versus nurture argument in the production of elite athletes. Yes, passion for a sport, conducive local environment plus the 10,000 hours of practice rule help in athletic excellence but genetics and body-types are key to becoming an elite athlete. Enjoyable quick read. This book could easily have been expanded to include more insights into soccer and F1 racers fitness and genetic uniqueness.
Date published: 2015-08-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A look at nature and nurture applied to sports Contrary to the title, there isn't one gene that makes you great at all sports, but there are genes that can make you better at specific sports. So really, this is a book that goes over the genetics of successful people in every sport, from sprinting to dog sledding. With that said, it isn't a book that says only genes matter, it also looks in how the way Kenyans grow up and the opportunity of distance running plays into their success at that sport. Overall it seems to be a balanced picture at what makes successful athletes. I enjoyed it quite a bit.
Date published: 2015-03-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating! An excellent response to the 10,000 hr rule from the outliers. An interesting read for anyone interested in what it takes to be at the top of their sport. Great research , well written.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating, even for casual athletes If you're even a casual athlete or weekend warrior, you'll be fascinated by this study of how different athletes of varying backgrounds and echelons of performance respond to different types of training. There's a lot more to Kenyan running success than altitude, for example, but altitude training does help, and it helps some Kenyan runners far more than others. The book surfaces big questions like, what's professional sport supposed to do with people whose natural physiology trips blood-doping tests? Human beings are really, really complex organisms, and sport pushes our limits in really interesting ways. I still think about this book when I'm out for a run.
Date published: 2014-11-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Sports Gene Insightful. I'll never look at training the same way again.
Date published: 2014-08-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Sports Gene. Will Written and well Researched. Learned a lot of insight into not only Athletes but groups of people. Highly Recommend this Book!
Date published: 2014-08-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for coaches Incredibly well researched book, and thoroughly enjoyable to read. It had me rethinking much of what I had previously thought concerning what it takes to be a good athlete
Date published: 2014-07-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really fascinating read I really enjoyed this book. Doing it all fascinating... Love the genetics aspect, but also the research that it backs it up.
Date published: 2014-02-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Analyst This book opened my mind to the complicated interplay genetics have in sports. It challenges stereotyping and generalizing, and ultimately the bias we bring into our understanding of people and their abilities. The book is nuanced, which is a fair way to assess the topic.
Date published: 2014-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sports Gene Great book. Highly interesting and thought provoking. A must read for anyone interested in the Science of Sport
Date published: 2013-09-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Brief Summary and Review *A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20, 2013. What does it take to become an elite athlete? The intuitive answer for most of us is that it probably takes some lucky genes on the one hand, and a whole heck of a lot of hard work on the other. Specifically, that we may need to be blessed with a particular body type to excel at a particular sport or discipline (after all, elite marathon runners tend to look far different from elite NFL running backs, who in turn tend to look far different from elite swimmers), but that beyond this it is practice and diligence that paves the way to success. When we look at the science, though--as sports writer David Epstein does in his new book The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance--we find that the story is much more complicated than this. In general terms we find that nature and nurture interact at every step of the way in the development of an elite athlete, and that biology plays far more of a role (and in far more ways) than we may have expected. To begin with, when it comes to physiology, we find that biology does indeed have a large role to play in influencing our height and skeletal structure (as we would expect), but that biology also influences physiology in many other ways that are important when it comes to elite sports. For example, we find that people naturally vary widely in all of the following ways: the size of our heart and lungs, and the amount of red blood cells and hemoglobin that pumps through our veins; the specific type of muscle fibers that are most prevalent in our bodies (and the specific number of each); as well as our visual acuity--and again, all of these factors play a significant role in determining just how athletic we will be (and in what sports we will excel). Second, when it comes to training, we find that hard work is not all there is to it. For biology not only shapes our physiology, but also how our physiology responds to training (including how much muscle mass and aerobic capacity we are able to build through exercise). The fact is that we naturally vary widely in just how much we respond to exercise (to the point where some of us improve dramatically through exercise, whereas others of us respond hardly at all). And we also respond differently to different training regimens (to the point where a training regime that works for one person may in fact harm another). And while we may wish to take credit for just how hard we train, here too biology is found to play a role. For it turns out that we differ widely in just how naturally disposed we are to push ourselves. And over and above this, biology also influences how much we experience pain, such that even among those who experience the same desire to push themselves (both in training and in competition), one may find it much easier to handle the pain involved than the other--which, of course, can have a big impact on results. And speaking of pain, our biology even influences how easily we injure and how well we recover from our injuries--which, once again, has a significant impact on performance. As an added bonus, Epstein not only covers which biological factors have an impact on sports performance, but the evolutionary story of these biological factors (including why different populations that have adapted to different environments have come to acquire traits that make them well-disposed to different sports and disciplines [for example, why many elite marathoners have origins in East Africa, many elite sprinters have origins in West Africa, and many elite swimmers and weight-lifters have origins in Europe]). In short, then, biology plays much more of a role in elite athletic performance that we may have realized. Not that the point of the book is to say that athletic performance is all in our genes. Just the contrary, as mentioned above the book makes the point that genes always interact with the environment to produce athletic outcomes. Genes are essential in shaping the athlete, but just as essential is the athlete's upbringing and culture, and that they do in fact get the training that is needed to make the most of their natural talents. This book is a triumph. I can't imagine it would be possible to cover the topic better than the author has. The science involved is thoroughly researched; the anecdotes are perfectly chosen and add both context and interest (many of them are downright inspirational); and it is all presented in a very clear and thoroughly enjoyable way. Well done Mr. Epstein. A full executive summary of the book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20; a podcast discussion of the book will be available shortly thereafter.
Date published: 2013-08-13

Table of Contents

Preface

Why Compete?

Racing with Integrity

Tools for Goal Setting: Vision, Season Goal, Supporting Goals

Make a Plan

Tools for Planning Your Training: Yearly Calendar, Monthly Plans

Free Yourself to Fly

Self-Assessment: Perspective

A Simple Guide to Good Racing

Tools for Competing: Starter Race Strategies for 5K, 10K, 13.1, 26.2, Race Strategy

The Power of Presence

The Way to Winning

The Comparison Trap

Get in Your Zone

Self-Assessment: Your Zone

Personality Power

Self-Assessment: SWOT Analysis

Making the Case for Yourself

Self-Assessment: Build Your Case

Keep Joy in the Game

Self-Assessment: Find Balance

The Belief Effect

Tools for Competing: Race Plan, Race Review, Race Calendar

Self-Assessment: Reflect

7 Truths About Competition

Tool: Pace Chart

Editorial Reviews

Praise for the Believe Training Journal Series"From real-life biffies (and professional runners) Lauren Fleshman and Roisin McGettigan-Dumas, this new Compete Training Journal in the pairs "Believe I Am" series is a lovely way to keep race-specific training on track." - Women's Running"[Compete Training Journal is] the most perfect logbook I've come across. It's comprehensive, yet simple, encourages healthy competition and motivates runners of all levels..This logbook is perfect. Grab a copy, pick a race and get after it, one week at a time and, as the authors note, compete for you." - Run Oregon"Believe Training Journal is more than just your typical training log.A comprehensive, well-designed book.Our favorite training log yet. If you're in the marketing for a new physical training log and you need a little more inspiration to get out the door every day, try Believe Training Journal." - Runner's World"Fleshman and McGettigan-Dumas have successfully meshed two beneficial training concepts: a way to log your daily miles and space to write and reflect on your runner self.For runner girls in need of a new coach, travel companion, or run bud that never complains, this leather-bound journal is a perfect choice." - Competitor magazine"Record progress alongside daily inspiration and tips from pro women runners." - SELF "Just started dating a sporty woman? Go for something low-key yet thoughtful like this inspirational [Believe I Am] training journal. If she's training for her very first 5K or her 10th marathon, she can track her progress on the cute illustrated pages. With goal-setting tips and worksheets, motivational advice from female athletes, and blank pages for her to record her thoughts about running, or just life in general, this comprehensive diary will make getting to the finish line way more fun." - Men's Fitness"A journal that's dedicated to her day-to-day training. Sorry, boyfriend woes. This journal is strictly for documenting the ups and downs of training. Packed with photographs, practical advice, and inspiration, the running log also includes tips from its authors, two professional female runners." - Glamour"Believe Training Journal is a workbook and training log that also includes notes, photos, plus pro tips and secrets, all in a gorgeous format. Sweet." - Fit Bottomed Girls"This book reveals that it is something a little bit different. It is definitely a unique and well thought-out format. A book by runners, for runners." - Athletics Weekly"Folks who love monitoring every last detail of their workouts will dig this training-focused journal.[which is] a guidebook focused on helping female athletes get their bodies and minds on the same page when it comes to setting running goals. Whether you want to run a 5K or complete your first marathon, this journal will help you figure out your blind spots and avoid race day anxiety." - DailyBurn.com"Give your runner the training secrets of Olympians. Designed by pro runners Lauren Fleshman and Ro McGettigan, the Believe I Am Training Journal encourages runners to think holistically about their training. The inspiring visual cues, tips, goal-setting worksheets and 'bigger picture' pages make this a training log like no other." -Active.com"While everybody is oohing and aahing over Apple's newest release, we're salivating over the new Believe Training Journal. Written and illustrated by the witty, insightful, and talented Ro McGettigan and Lauren Fleshman, this journal helps you beautifully document your workouts, as well as your goals, your setbacks, your achievements, your life." -AnotherMotherRunner.com"Anyone who's committing to run a race in 2013 will benefit from this cute Believe I Am Training Journal. Designed by pro athletes Lauren Fleshman and Ro McGettigan, not only is the format ideal for a training diary, but it's also thin enough to toss in any purse or gym bag when you're on the go!" -Fit Sugar"We were simply smitten with the Believe I Am Training Journal. We review a lot of different workout products, but this one really stood out for doing more than just tracking facts and miles. It gives women a place to dream, feel and doodle. It gives them a place to not just reach their fitness goals-but to feel proud about themselves inside and out!" -Fit Bottomed Girls"Amazing quotes and great info!" - Paula Radcliffe, marathon world record holder, 3-time London Marathon winner, 2005 marathon world champion"2015 dreaming starts now. Thanks for the inspiration to keep moving forward!" - Linsey Corbin, professional triathlete with 24 podium finishes at Ironman and Ironman 70.3 races"I've kept a running log for the last 11 years and the Believe I Am Training Journal has been my favorite. It's not just a space to log miles but a journal to map out the year's plans, details, and dreams while encouraging a positive mind-set along the way!" -Molly Huddle, U.S. Olympian and 5K record holder"I keep my Believe I Am Training Journal to track my training and progress. Keeping a journal allows me to gain confidence when I look back on what I have done and shows how I have prepared for a racing season. It also allows me to look back and take note if there are periods when I didn't feel as good so I can recognise this and adjust accordingly." -Mary Cullen, NCAA Champion and European Medalist"Their instruction [in Believe Training Journal] is completely void of elitist rhetoric, and comes across more like that one trusted friend and training partner who has the guts to say what you need to hear." - TriEdge.net"My Believe I Am Training Journal is an easy way to plan, track, and achieve my goals! It has an open format that easily captures the day-to-day progress with additional sections to plan and elaborate." -Jen Bingham, The Local Elite"I love that the Believe I Am Training Journal helped me realize that I have some non-fitness goals I need to focus on first before ramping up my fitness goals again." -Laura Williams, Girls Gone Sporty