Composition as a Human Science: Contributions to the Self-Understanding of a Discipline by Louise Wetherbee Phelps

Composition as a Human Science: Contributions to the Self-Understanding of a Discipline

byLouise Wetherbee PhelpsAs told byLouise W. Phelps

Paperback | April 30, 1999

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This groundbreaking collection of essays is one of the first works to reflect directly and systematically on the conceptual and ethical basis for composition studies as a new discipline of written language. Phelps articulates a philosophy of composition generous enough to accommodate all thestrands of current work without being overly eclectic--an open framework subject to modification and addition as the field develops. She draws on wide reading in the humanities and social sciences--including cognitive science, linguistics, literary theory, education, philosophy, hermeneutics,rhetoric, and psychology--to define the contribution and place of composition studies within the larger intellectual and cultural community. The book will therefore interest theorists and scholars in a wide variety of fields.

About The Author

Louise Wetherbee Phelps is at Syracuse University.
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Title:Composition as a Human Science: Contributions to the Self-Understanding of a DisciplineFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.27 × 5.51 × 0.75 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195067827

ISBN - 13:9780195067828

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Drawing on wide reading in cognitive science, linguistics, literary theory, education, philosophy, hermeneutics, rhetoric, and psychology, Phelps arrives at a new conception of composition as a discipline linked to many sciences and humanities rather than merely a branch of literary studies; and further defines its link to the broader cultural themes of rhetoric, writing, praxis, and context.

Editorial Reviews

"The truth is, I really like this book, with emphasis on the present tense; I find myself rereading it, pondering it, defending it, attacking it, recommending it to my students."--Journal of Advanced Composition