Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee by William H. NultyConfederate Florida: The Road to Olustee by William H. Nulty

Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee

byWilliam H. Nulty

Paperback | January 30, 1994

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At the end of 1863 the Federal forces in the Department of the South were tied up in siege operations against Charleston and Savannah, operations that showed little progress or promise. The commander of the Department, Major General Quincy A. Gillmore, led an expedition into Florida to recruit blacks, cut off commissary supplies headed for other parts of the Confederacy, and disrupt the railroad system within Florida. Expedition forces landed at Jacksonville on February 7, 1864.
 
The engagement at Olustee, not far from Gainesville, took place on February 20, 1864. it was the largest Civil War battle in Florida and one of the bloodiest Union defeats of the entire war. Nonetheless, because the engagement forced the Confederacy to divert 15,000 men from the thinly manned defense of Charleston and Savannah, it delayed critical reinforcement of the Army of Tennessee, which was fighting desperately to prevent the Union invasion of northwestern Georgia. Makin use of detailed maps and diagrams, Nulty presents a vivid account of this fascination Civil War effort.
William H. Nulty, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S.M.C. (ret.), is an instructor at Orange Park High School, Orange Park, Florida.
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Title:Confederate Florida: The Road to OlusteeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.9 inPublished:January 30, 1994Publisher:University of Alabama Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0817307486

ISBN - 13:9780817307486

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Editorial Reviews

“Based on extensive research. It is unlikely that the military aspects of the Battle of Olustee will need to be treated again for some time.”
—Journal of Southern History