Conflict of Norms in Public International Law: How WTO Law Relates to other Rules of International Law by Joost PauwelynConflict of Norms in Public International Law: How WTO Law Relates to other Rules of International Law by Joost Pauwelyn

Conflict of Norms in Public International Law: How WTO Law Relates to other Rules of International…

byJoost Pauwelyn

Paperback | January 18, 2009

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How do trade agreements interact with agreements on human rights or the environment? In case of conflict, which agreement should prevail? Must trade disputes be examined only from the angle of trade rules or should account be taken also of non-trade values? Joost Pauwelyn considers these questions and reveals how the different rules of international law interact, with the aid of procedural guidelines when conflict occurs. This book interests trade diplomats, international civil servants, lawyers, NGOs and scholars of public international law and international trade law.
Title:Conflict of Norms in Public International Law: How WTO Law Relates to other Rules of International…Format:PaperbackDimensions:560 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 1.26 inPublished:January 18, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052110047X

ISBN - 13:9780521100472

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Table of Contents

Preface; Table of cases; List of abbreviations; Introduction; 1. The topic and its importance: conflict of norms in public international law; 2. The case study: the law of the World Trade Organisation; 3. Hierarchy of sources; 4. Accumulation and conflict of norms; 5. Conflict-avoidance techniques; 6. Resolving 'inherent normative conflict'; 7. Resolving 'conflict in the applicable law' 8. Conflict of norms in WTO dispute settlement; Conclusions; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Pauwelyn's book deserves many credits for its unique value and contributions. It touches on an important subject-matter in the area of public international law. Undoubtedly, it is a laudable attempt to define conflict of norms in public international law, especially between WTO norms and non-WTO norms, in times of globalization and growing interdependence. The book is a product of serious enterprise both in its inclusiveness and profundity. It is very well-researched and rich in citations of jurisprudence and literatures." -- Global Law Books, Sungjoon Cho