Congo-Paris: Transnational Traders On The Margins Of The Law

Paperback | July 22, 2000

byJanet MacGaffey, Rémy Bazenguissa-ganga, R?my Bazenguissa-ganga

not yet rated|write a review

Congo-Paris
Transnational Traders on the Margins of the Law
Janet MacGaffey and Rémy Bazenguissa-Ganga

Globalization as practiced by Congolese traders who operate a thriving second economy linking Central Africa and Europe.

Congo-Paris investigates the transnational trade between Central Africa and Europe by focusing on the lives of individual traders from Kinshasa and Brazzaville who operate across national frontiers and often outside the law. Challenging the boundaries of traditional anthropology, Janet MacGaffey and Rémy Bazenguissa-Ganga follow complex international networks to examine the ways in which the African second economy has been extended transnationally and globally on the margins of the law. Who are these traders? What strategies do they have, not only to survive but to shine? What kinds of networks do they rely on? What implications does their trade have for the study of globalization? The personal networks of ethnicity, kinship, religion, and friendship constructed by the traders fashion a world of their own. From Johannesburg to Cairo and from Dakar to Nairobi as well as in Paris, the Congolese traders are renowned and envied. This lively book shows that it is not just the multinationals who benefit from jets and mobile phones.

Janet MacGaffey, Professor of Anthropology at Bucknell University, is author of Entrepreneurs and Parasites and coauthor of The Real Economy of Zaire.

Rémy Bazenguissa-Ganga teaches at the Centre d'Études Africaines, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, and is author of Les Voies du politique au Congo: Essai de sociologie historique.

African Issues-Alex de Waal and Stephen Ellis, editors
Published in association with the International African Institute, London

Contents
Traders, Trade Networks, and Research Methods
Resisting Exclusion and Reacting to Disorder
Commodities, Commercialization, and the Structuring of Identity
Contesting Boundaries: The Defiant Search for Success
The Organization of the Trade: The Importance of Personal Ties
To Surve and Shine: Two Oppositional Cultures
Conclusion: The Wider Context

Pricing and Purchase Info

$28.18

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25
HURRY, ONLY 1 LEFT!

From the Publisher

Congo-ParisTransnational Traders on the Margins of the LawJanet MacGaffey and Rémy Bazenguissa-GangaGlobalization as practiced by Congolese traders who operate a thriving second economy linking Central Africa and Europe.Congo-Paris investigates the transnational trade between Central Africa and Europe by focusing on the lives of indivi...

Janet MacGaffey is Professor of Anthropology at Bucknell University, author of Entrepreneurs and Parasites, and coauthor of The Real Economy of Zaire. Re[acute accent over the e]my Bazenguissa-Ganga teaches at the Centre d'Etudes Africaines, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, and is author of Les Voies du politique au...

other books by Janet MacGaffey

Coal Dust on Your Feet: The Rise, Decline, and Restoration of an Anthracite Mining Town
Coal Dust on Your Feet: The Rise, Decline, and Restorat...

Kobo ebook|Sep 5 2013

$44.69 online$57.99list price(save 22%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 8.5 × 5.3 × 0.67 inPublished:July 22, 2000Publisher:Indiana University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0253214025

ISBN - 13:9780253214027

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Congo-Paris: Transnational Traders On The Margins Of The Law

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Preliminary Table of Contents:

Introduction
1. Traders, Trade Networks, and Research Methods
2. Resisting Exclusion and Reacting to disorder
3. Commodities, Commercialization, and the Structuring of Identity
4. Contesting Boundaries: The Defiant Search for Success
5. The Organization of the Trade: The Importance of Personal Ties
6. To Surve and Shine: Two Oppositional Cultures
7. Conclusion: The Wider Context