Conjuring Spirits: Texts and Traditions of Medieval Ritual Magic by Claire Fanger

Conjuring Spirits: Texts and Traditions of Medieval Ritual Magic

EditorClaire FangerContribution byRichard Kieckhefer, Nicholas Watson

Paperback | April 8, 2004

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Conjuring Spirits contains both general surveys and analyses of magical texts and manuscripts by distinguished scholars in a variety of disciplines. Included are chapters by Richard Kieckhefer and Robert Mathiesen on the Sworn Book of Honorius, Michael Camille on the Ars Notoria, John B. Friedman on the Secretum Philosophorum, Nicholas Watson on the McMaster text, and Elizabeth Wade on Lullian divination. The work also includes Juris Lidaka's edition of the Liber de Angelis, and an overview of late medieval English ritual manuscripts by Frank Klaassen. This book will be invaluable for scholars and other readers interested in ritual magic in the later Middle Ages.

About The Author

Claire Fanger is a visiting faculty member at the University of Western Ontario. She is the co-editor of The Latin Verses in the "Confessio Amantis" (1991). Claire Fanger is a visiting faculty member at the University of Western Ontario. She is the co-editor of The Latin Verses in the "Confessio Amantis" (1991).

Details & Specs

Title:Conjuring Spirits: Texts and Traditions of Medieval Ritual MagicFormat:PaperbackDimensions:308 pages, 9.23 × 6.17 × 0.68 inPublished:April 8, 2004Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271025174

ISBN - 13:9780271025179

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“Well illustrated throughout and with a very useful bibliography and index, Fanger’s volume adds considerable weight to the need to study magic as part of the broader religious and scientific discoures of the later Middle Ages.”

—Gary K. Waite, Sixteenth Century Journal