Constructing Russian Culture in the Age of Revolution: 1881-1940

Paperback | March 1, 1998

EditorCatriona Kelly, David Shepherd

not yet rated|write a review
Constructing Russian Culture offers a pioneering new account of the relationship between literature and other cultural forms in Late Imperial Russia and Revolutionary Russia. The general consensus in Western study of Russia and the Soviet Union has been that understanding of `historical background' is essential to the study of `literature'. But this consensus has so far failed to produce sophisticated overviews of the culture as a whole; literary histories seldomventure outside a rigid canon of authors and literary groupings, and the account of `historical background' sometimes amount to little more than a listing of certain predictable political and social factors that can be perceived to have `influenced' (or impeded) literary developments. This book is an ambitious attempt to recontextualize Russian literature, and rethink the relations between literature and other cultural forms. The book examines a number of, in Bourdieu's term `cultural fields' in late Imperial Russia: science and objectivity; national and personal identity;consumerism and commercial culture. There is also a `keywords' introduction explaining the evolution of concepts of the self, the nation, and `literariness' in Russian culture, and an `Epilogue' outlining the further history of the central themes after 1917. Contributors include leading specialists in Russian literature, cultural history, and cultural theory from Britain, the USA, and Russia. Intended as a companion to Russian Cultural Studies: An Introduction (also OUP), this stimulating, original, and controversial book will be a vital resource forall those interested in Russian culture during `the age of Revolution'.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$97.91 online
$98.95 list price
Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Constructing Russian Culture offers a pioneering new account of the relationship between literature and other cultural forms in Late Imperial Russia and Revolutionary Russia. The general consensus in Western study of Russia and the Soviet Union has been that understanding of `historical background' is essential to the study of `lite...

David Shepherd is Professor of Russian, founder and Director of the Bakhtin Centre, University of Sheffield Catriona Kelly is University Lecturer in Russian and Fellow at New College, Oxford

other books by Catriona Kelly

Soviet and Post-Soviet Identities
Soviet and Post-Soviet Identities

Kobo ebook|Apr 26 2012

$97.09 online$125.98list price(save 22%)
St Petersburg: Shadows of the Past
St Petersburg: Shadows of the Past

Kobo ebook|Feb 28 2014

$27.79 online$36.09list price(save 22%)
Comrade Pavlik: The Rise And Fall Of A Soviet Boy Hero
Comrade Pavlik: The Rise And Fall Of A Soviet Boy Hero

Kobo ebook|Apr 3 2014

$13.29 online$17.21list price(save 22%)
see all books by Catriona Kelly
Format:PaperbackDimensions:372 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.79 inPublished:March 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198742355

ISBN - 13:9780198742357

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Constructing Russian Culture in the Age of Revolution: 1881-1940

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION: Literature, History, CulturePART I: PROLOGUE: KEY CONCEPTS BEFORE 1881`Lichnost': Notions of Individual Identity before 1881; Obshchestvennost' Sobornost' : Collective Identities before 1881; Narodnost' : Notions of National Identity before 1881; Literaturnost' : Literature and the Marketplace before 1881PART II: CULTURAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN IMPERIAL RUSSIAChapter 1: The Objective Eye and the Common GoodChapter 2: Commercial Culture and Consumerism in Late Imperial RussiaChapter 3: Collapse and Creation: Issues of Identity and the Russian fin de sieclePART III: EPILOGUE: CONSTRUCTING A NEW RUSSIAChange and Continuity in the Aftermath of Revolution; Introduction: Iconoclasm and Commemorating the Past; New Boundaries for the `Common Good': Science, Philanthropy, and Objectivity in Soviet Russia; Programmes for Identity: The `New Man' and the `New Woman'; Directed Desires: Kul'turnost' andConsumption in Post- Revolutionary Russia; Conclusion: From `Russian Empire' to ` Soviet Union'APPENDICESANALYTICAL INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACESSUBJECT INDEX

Editorial Reviews

'The successive essays ... traverse a vast panorama, often with insight and panache. ... this volume's many achievements make its appearance a milestone in Russian studies.' Slavic Review