Consuming Angels: Advertising and Victorian Women

Hardcover | August 1, 1979

byLori Anne Loeb

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Timid and retiring, the Victorian housewife was an "angel in the house," or so says the stereotype. But when this angel picked up a popular magazine--The Lady, for instance--she saw in its advertisements images of Grecian goddesses, women warriors, queens, actresses, adventurers. Thesearrestingly sexual and surprisingly powerful images are the subject of Consuming Angels, a major examination of how Victorian ads shaped social values. Stylishly written and featuring 73 reproductions, this book shows how ads used the hedonistic aspects of Victorian culture to sell their wares,glorified consumerism, and mythologized the middle-class life. Images of aggressive women, Loeb shows, played well to both men and women. And ultimately, these ads helped usher in the twentieth century with the creation of a new community: the community of consumers.

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Timid and retiring, the Victorian housewife was an "angel in the house," or so says the stereotype. But when this angel picked up a popular magazine--The Lady, for instance--she saw in its advertisements images of Grecian goddesses, women warriors, queens, actresses, adventurers. Thesearrestingly sexual and surprisingly powerful images...

Lori Anne Loeb is Assistant Professor of Modern British History at the University of South Carolina.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 9.57 × 6.38 × 0.79 inPublished:August 1, 1979Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195085965

ISBN - 13:9780195085969

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"There is much to commend in this book. This book is a treasure trove of beautifully illustrated Victorian advertisements, and the reader acquires a real appreciation of the range and typology of the genre."--American Historical Review