Contagious: Why Things Catch On

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Contagious: Why Things Catch On

by Jonah Berger
Read by Keith Nobbs

Simon & Schuster Audio | March 5, 2013 | Audio Book (CD)

Contagious: Why Things Catch On is rated 5 out of 5 by 1.
Why do certain products and ideas go viral? Dynamic young Wharton professor Jonah Berger draws on his research to explain the six steps that make products or ideas contagious.

Why do some products get more word of mouth than others? Why does some online content go viral? Word of mouth makes products, ideas, and behaviors catch on. It’s more influential than advertising and far more effective.

Can you create word of mouth for your product or idea? According to Berger, you can. Whether you operate a neighborhood restaurant, a corporation with hundreds of employees, or are running for a local office for the first time, the steps that can help your product or idea become viral are the same.

Contagious is filled with fascinating information drawn from Berger’s research. You will be surprised to learn, for example, just how little word of mouth is generated online versus elsewhere. Already praised by Dan Ariely and Dan Gilbert, and sold in nine countries, this book is a must-read for people who want their projects and ideas to succeed.

Format: Audio Book (CD)

Dimensions: 5.88 × 5.12 × 0.6 in

Published: March 5, 2013

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1442359374

ISBN - 13: 9781442359376

Found in: Marketing and Sales

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from VERY INFORMATIVE In this day and age so many people believe that advertising and/or social media drive trends. New words have even been coined to describe the phenomenon … trending or viral. But are those two things enough to explain why people would be willing to pay $100 for a cheese steak sandwich, why a certain video gets millions of hits on YouTube or one brand of blender outsells another? Not really. In this book Jonah Berger looks at why things catch on. A look at his credentials and there is no doubt that he did the research he describes and that his theories are sound. Not only sound, but surprisingly interesting and delivered in a concise and often humorous manner. Even someone who has never studied marketing (ME) understood and enjoyed this book. The scariest thing about reading this little book? I came to realize just how gullible I am when it comes to advertising and media. It’s a bit of an eye-opener!
Date published: 2013-05-03

– More About This Product –

Contagious: Why Things Catch On

Contagious: Why Things Catch On

by Jonah Berger
Read by Keith Nobbs

Format: Audio Book (CD)

Dimensions: 5.88 × 5.12 × 0.6 in

Published: March 5, 2013

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1442359374

ISBN - 13: 9781442359376

About the Book

Why do certain products and ideas go viral? Dynamic young Wharton professor Berger draws on his research to explain the six steps that make products or ideas contagious.

Read from the Book

2. Triggers Walt Disney World. Say those words to children under the age of eight and just wait for their excited screams. More than 18 million people from all over the world visit the Orlando, Florida, theme park annually. Older kids love the frightening plummet down Space Mountain and the Tower of Terror. Younger ones savor the magic of Cinderella’s castle and the thrill of exploring the rivers of Africa in the Jungle Cruise. Even adults beam joyously when shaking hands with beloved Disney characters like Mickey Mouse and Goofy. Memories of my own first visit in the early 1990s still make me smile. My cousin and I were picked from the audience to play Gilligan and the Skipper in a reenactment of Gilligan’s Island. The look of wild triumph on my face when I successfully steered the boat to safety—after being doused with dozens of buckets of water—is still family lore. Now compare these exhilarating images with a box of Honey Nut Cheerios. Yes, the classic breakfast cereal with a bee mascot that “packs the goodness of Cheerios with the irresistible taste of golden honey.” Considered reasonably healthy, Honey Nut Cheerios is still sugary enough to appeal to children and anyone with a sweet tooth and has become a staple of many American households. Which of these products—Disney World or Honey Nut Cheerios—do you think gets more word of mouth? The Magic Kingdom? The self-described place where dreams come true? Or Cheerios? The breakfast cereal made of whole grain oats that can
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From the Publisher

Why do certain products and ideas go viral? Dynamic young Wharton professor Jonah Berger draws on his research to explain the six steps that make products or ideas contagious.

Why do some products get more word of mouth than others? Why does some online content go viral? Word of mouth makes products, ideas, and behaviors catch on. It’s more influential than advertising and far more effective.

Can you create word of mouth for your product or idea? According to Berger, you can. Whether you operate a neighborhood restaurant, a corporation with hundreds of employees, or are running for a local office for the first time, the steps that can help your product or idea become viral are the same.

Contagious is filled with fascinating information drawn from Berger’s research. You will be surprised to learn, for example, just how little word of mouth is generated online versus elsewhere. Already praised by Dan Ariely and Dan Gilbert, and sold in nine countries, this book is a must-read for people who want their projects and ideas to succeed.

Editorial Reviews

“Think of it as the practical companion to Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point.”