Contextualizing Cassian: Aristocrats, Asceticism, and Reformation in Fifth-Century Gaul by Richard J. Goodrich

Contextualizing Cassian: Aristocrats, Asceticism, and Reformation in Fifth-Century Gaul

byRichard J. Goodrich

Hardcover | September 2, 2007

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Richard J. Goodrich examines the attempt by the fifth-century ascetic writer John Cassian to influence and shape the development of Western monasticism. Goodrich's close analysis of Cassian's earliest work (The Institutes) focuses on his interaction with the values and preconceptions of atraditional Roman elite, as well as his engagement with contemporary writers. By placing The Institutes in context, Goodrich demonstrates just how revolutionary this foundational work was for its time and milieu.

About The Author

Richard J. Goodrich is a Research Fellow in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Bristol.
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Details & Specs

Title:Contextualizing Cassian: Aristocrats, Asceticism, and Reformation in Fifth-Century GaulFormat:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.94 inPublished:September 2, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199213135

ISBN - 13:9780199213139

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. The World of Gallic Asceticism2. Experientia vs. Gallic Inexperience3. Experientia vs. Other Builders4. Instituta as Independent Authority5. Renuntiatio and the `Rhetoric of Renunciation'Conclusion