Contracultura: Alternative Arts and Social Transformation in Authoritarian Brazil by Christopher DunnContracultura: Alternative Arts and Social Transformation in Authoritarian Brazil by Christopher Dunn

Contracultura: Alternative Arts and Social Transformation in Authoritarian Brazil

byChristopher Dunn

Paperback | November 14, 2016

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Christopher Dunn's history of authoritarian Brazil exposes the inventive cultural production and intense social transformations that emerged during the rule of an iron-fisted military regime during the sixties and seventies. The Brazilian contracultura was a complex and multifaceted phenomenon that developed alongside the ascent of hardline forces within the regime in the late 1960s. Focusing on urban, middle-class Brazilians often inspired by the international counterculture that flourished in the United States and parts of western Europe, Dunn shows how new understandings of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship erupted under even the most oppressive political conditions.

Dunn reveals previously ignored connections between the counterculture and Brazilian music, literature, film, visual arts, and alternative journalism. In chronicling desbunde, the Brazilian hippie movement, he shows how the state of Bahia, renowned for its Afro-Brazilian culture, emerged as a countercultural mecca for youth in search of spiritual alternatives. As this critical and expansive book demonstrates, many of the country's social and justice movements have their origins in the countercultural attitudes, practices, and sensibilities that flourished during the military dictatorship.

Christopher Dunn, associate professor of Brazilian literary and cultural studies at Tulane University, is the author of Brutality Garden: Tropicalia and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture.
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Title:Contracultura: Alternative Arts and Social Transformation in Authoritarian BrazilFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:272 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.68 inShipping dimensions:9.25 × 6.12 × 0.68 inPublished:November 14, 2016Publisher:The University Of North Carolina PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1469628511

ISBN - 13:9781469628516

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Editorial Reviews

Christopher Dunn's history of authoritarian Brazil exposes the inventive cultural production and intense social transformations that emerged during the rule of an iron-fisted military regime during the sixties and seventies. The Brazilian contracultura was a complex and multifaceted phenomenon that developed alongside the ascent of hardline forces within the regime in the late 1960s. Focusing on urban, middle-class Brazilians often inspired by the international counterculture that flourished in the United States and parts of western Europe, Dunn shows how new understandings of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship erupted under even the most oppressive political conditions. Dunn reveals previously ignored connections between the counterculture and Brazilian music, literature, film, visual arts, and alternative journalism. In chronicling desbunde, the Brazilian hippie movement, he shows how the state of Bahia, renowned for its Afro-Brazilian culture, emerged as a countercultural mecca for youth in search of spiritual alternatives. As this critical and expansive book demonstrates, many of the country's social and justice movements have their origins in the countercultural attitudes, practices, and sensibilities that flourished during the military dictatorship.Contracultura will become the foundational work in English on Brazil's countercultural movement during the long 1960s. Revealing with tremendous insight and nuance the cross-currents of cultural protest, left-wing politics, state authoritarianism, and market forces, Christopher Dunn not only highlights the diversity of countercultural movements that emerged concurrently across Latin America during this period but also rightfully affirms the definitive place of Brazil's contracultura within that landscape.--Eric Zolov, Stony Brook University