Conversations on Chemistry (Volume 2); The Chemistry of the Most Important Elements and Compounds…

Paperback | January 11, 2012

byWilhelm Ostwald

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1906. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... it; the exit tube dips into an empty jar. You see that watervapour is very soon formed. It condenses to water in the jar. (Fig. 12.) Express your thanks by writing down the equation for this reaction. P. NaOH+HCl = NaCl+H20. M. Rightl 11. SALTS. M. Rehearse! P. I learned yesterday how to make hydrochloric and other acids: we heat their salts with sulphuric acid. M. You. have expressed this rather too concisely; to be sure, we generally use sulphuric acid, but for what reason? P. Perhaps, because it is cheapest. M. That would be one advantage, but it is not the decisive reason. What property must the acid which we produce have? P. I know of no special one. We simply apply heat and the acid comes off as vapour, or gas, and can be collected. M. You have described just the property I want: the acid which we wish to obtain must be easily volatile, and the acid which we use for the decomposition of the salt must be non-volatile. Sulphuric acid has this latter property, and, therefore, we use it for this purpose. P. Then, conversely, can we not also decompose sodium sulphate with hydrochloric acid? M. You have asked me that already, and I told you that in the liquid condition a partial reaction takes place. But if we apply heat the hydrochloric acid just evaporates away and the sodium sulphate remains behind, as if it had never been decomposed at all. P. Ah; I now, for the first time, understand this. It is just what you described on p. 82. So sulphuric acid is not easily volatile? M. No; it only boils at 338°C; while the highest boiling mixture of water and hydrochloric acid boils at no°, and water-free hydrogen chloride is a gas. P. And what of acetic acid? M. It boils at 118°, so it is out of the question. Now let us learn another, and last, law about...

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1906. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... it; the exit tube dips into an empty jar. You see that watervapour is very soon formed. It condenses to water in the jar. (Fig. 12.) ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:100 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.21 inPublished:January 11, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217823289

ISBN - 13:9780217823289

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