Conversion And Reform In The British Novel In The 1790s: A Revolution of Opinions by A. MarkleyConversion And Reform In The British Novel In The 1790s: A Revolution of Opinions by A. Markley

Conversion And Reform In The British Novel In The 1790s: A Revolution of Opinions

byA. Markley

Hardcover | January 8, 2009

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Dramatically expanding the boundaries of the British “Jacobin” novel, Conversion and Reform in the British Novel in the 1790s analyzes the works of a wide range of British reformists writing in the 1790s, including William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Smith, Mary Robinson, and Maria Edgeworth, who reshaped the conventions of contemporary fiction to position the novel as a progressive political tool.  Rather than aiming to launch a bloody revolution, these authors worked to initiate social and political reform in such areas as women’s rights, abolition, the Jewish question, and the leveling of the class system in Britain by converting the individual reader, one reader at a time.

A. A. Markley is Associate Professor of English at Penn State University, Brandywine, and is the author of Stateliest Measures: Tennyson and the Literature of Greece and Rome.  He has co-edited editions of William Godwin’s Caleb Williams and Fleetwood and has edited a volume of Mary Shelley’s uncollected works, Charlotte Smith’s The Y...
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Title:Conversion And Reform In The British Novel In The 1790s: A Revolution of OpinionsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:January 8, 2009Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230612296

ISBN - 13:9780230612297

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Table of Contents

Introduction: An Epoch in the Mind of the Reader * The Many Faces of the Reformist Hero * Incarcerated Women and the Uses of the Gothic * Race and the Disenfranchised in 1790s Britain * Gambling, Dueling, and Social Depravity in the Haut Ton * The Dulci with the Utile: Allegorical and Utopian Romance

Editorial Reviews

"Markley's Conversion and Reform in the British Novel in the 1790s is an intelligent, comprehensive, accessible study of reformist fiction in the late eighteenth century, and it will be of much use to scholars and students of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century literature."--Eighteenth-Century Fiction“An expansive and inclusive study, Markley’s Conversion and Reform in the British Novel in the 1790s reconfigures the familiar ground of the ‘Jacobin’ and ‘anti-Jacobin’ novels by posing a larger concept of reformist literature. This audacious tour impressively ties together a wider range of works than has been considered previously, highlighting the full scope of calls for reform across the political spectrum. This will be an essential reference for anyone interested in nascent debates on the nature of gender, race, ethnicity, and manhood conducted in novels at the end of the 1700s.” —Miriam L. Wallace, Associate Professor of English, New College of Florida"Markley is an accomplished scholar. Conversion and Reform in the British Novel in the 1790s examines numerous texts that have fallen into obscurity and thus promises to expand scholarly knowledge of the novels of the Romantic (or revolutionary) era.  In addition, the historical and cultural contexts supplied in the chapters on race and upper-class vices are lucid and instructive." —William D. Brewer, Professor of English, Appalachian State University"Markley's Conversion and Reform in the British Novel in the 1790s is an intelligent, comprehensive, accessible study of reformist fiction in the late eighteenth century, and it will be of much use to scholars and students of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century literature." —Nancy E. Johnson, SUNY New Paltz