Corridors Of Power: The Politics Of Environmental Aid To Madagascar

Hardcover | August 23, 2016

byCatherine A. Corson

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Since the 1970s, the U.S. Agency for International Development has spent millions of dollars to preserve Madagascar’s rich biological diversity. Yet its habitats are still in decline. Studying forty years of policy making in multiple sites, Catherine Corson reveals how blaming impoverished Malagasy farmers for Madagascar’s environmental decline has avoided challenging other drivers of deforestation, such as the logging and mining industries. In this important ethnographic study, Corson reveals how Madagascar’s environmental program reflects the transformation of global environmental governance under neoliberalism.

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Since the 1970s, the U.S. Agency for International Development has spent millions of dollars to preserve Madagascar’s rich biological diversity. Yet its habitats are still in decline. Studying forty years of policy making in multiple sites, Catherine Corson reveals how blaming impoverished Malagasy farmers for Madagascar’s environmenta...

Catherine A. Corson is the Miller Worley Associate Professor of Environmental Studies at Mount Holyoke College and has worked in the White House, United States Agency for International Development, United States Congress, and World Bank. She lives in Amherst, MA.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:336 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 1 inPublished:August 23, 2016Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300212275

ISBN - 13:9780300212273

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“Truly brilliant! Catherine Corson traces the environmental story in the one of the world’s most important biodiversity hotspots, showing how international and national power struggles undermined the well-meaning efforts of conservationists and donors, distorting sustainable development objectives in the country and ignoring the realities of peasant livelihoods. Personal insights from involvements in USAID, DFID, and numerous interactions in Madagascar and on Capitol Hill enliven this gripping account. It is a fascinating and well-documented read, brim-full of challenging perspectives for anyone engaged in trying to save the planet. It is indeed an important book.”—Sir Richard Jolly, Institute of Development Studies