Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court And The Future Of Constitutional Law by Mark TushnetCourt Divided: The Rehnquist Court And The Future Of Constitutional Law by Mark Tushnet

Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court And The Future Of Constitutional Law

byMark Tushnet

Paperback | December 27, 2005

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In this authoritative reckoning with the eighteen-year record of the Rehnquist Court, Georgetown law professor Mark Tushnet reveals how the decisions of nine deeply divided justices have left the future of the Court; and the nation; hanging in the balance. Many have assumed that the chasm on the Court has been between its liberals and its conservatives. In reality, the division was between those in tune with the modern post-Reagan Republican Party and those who, though considered to be in the Court's center, represent an older Republican tradition. As a result, the Court has modestly promoted the agenda of today's economic conservatives, but has regularly defeated the agenda of social issues conservatives; while paving the way for more radically conservative path in the future.
Mark Tushnet is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the author of A Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court and the Future of Constitutional Law. He divides his time between Washington, DC, and Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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Title:Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court And The Future Of Constitutional LawFormat:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1 inPublished:December 27, 2005Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393327574

ISBN - 13:9780393327571

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Editorial Reviews

"A balanced, insightful assessment of the dynamics of [the] Supreme court ... In this calm, unbiased study, Tushnet explains clearly how and why the Supreme Court reflects the nation's uneasy political consensus."