Courtly Letters in the Age of Henry VIII: Literary Culture and the Arts of Deceit by Seth LererCourtly Letters in the Age of Henry VIII: Literary Culture and the Arts of Deceit by Seth Lerer

Courtly Letters in the Age of Henry VIII: Literary Culture and the Arts of Deceit

bySeth Lerer

Paperback | December 14, 2006

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This revisionary study of the origins of courtly literature reveals the culture of spectatorship and voyeurism that shaped early Tudor English literary life. Through new research into the reception of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, it demonstrates how Pandarus became the model of the early modern courtier. In close readings of early Tudor poetry, court drama, letters, manuscript anthologies and printed books, Seth Lerer illuminates a "Pandaric" world of displayed bodies, surreptitious letters, and transgressive performances.
Title:Courtly Letters in the Age of Henry VIII: Literary Culture and the Arts of DeceitFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.63 inPublished:December 14, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521035279

ISBN - 13:9780521035279

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Acknowledgements; Note on editions and abbreviations; 1. Pretexts: Chaucer's Pandarus and the origins of courtly discourse; 2. The King's Pandars: performing courtiership in the 1510s; 3. The King's hand: body politics in the letters of Henry VIII; 4. Private quotations, public memories: Troilus and Criseyde and the politics of the manuscript anthology; 5. Wyatt, Chaucer, Tottel: the verse epistle and the subjects of the courtly lyric; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Lerer also offers some strong readings, especially of King Henry's love letters. And he comments well on manuscript collections of verse. This book belongs in libraries supporting graduate work in English literature and history." E.D. Hill, Choice