Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States

Paperback | April 1, 1987

byKenneth T. Jackson

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This first full-scale history of the development of the American suburb examines how "the good life" in America came to be equated with the a home of one's own surrounded by a grassy yard and located far from the urban workplace. Integrating social history with economic and architecturalanalysis, and taking into account such factors as the availability of cheap land, inexpensive building methods, and rapid transportation, Kenneth Jackson chronicles the phenomenal growth of the American suburb from the middle of the 19th century to the present day. He treats communities in everysection of the U.S. and compares American residential patterns with those of Japan and Europe. In conclusion, Jackson offers a controversial prediction: that the future of residential deconcentration will be very different from its past in both the U.S. and Europe.

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From Our Editors

 Tracing three centuries of technological, economic and social innovation, Kenneth T. Jackson, a history professor at Columbia University, presents the first full-scale history of the American suburb. Taking into account several factors including the availability of cheap land, inexpensive building methods and rapid transportation, Cra...

From the Publisher

This first full-scale history of the development of the American suburb examines how "the good life" in America came to be equated with the a home of one's own surrounded by a grassy yard and located far from the urban workplace. Integrating social history with economic and architecturalanalysis, and taking into account such factors a...

Kenneth T. Jackson, Professor of History at Columbia University, is the author of The Ku Klux Klan in the City, 1915-1930; Cities in American History; and a number of other books.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 5.31 × 7.91 × 0.91 inPublished:April 1, 1987Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195049837

ISBN - 13:9780195049831

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Table of Contents

1. Suburbs as Slums2. The Transportation Revolution and the Erosion of the Walking City3. Home Sweet Home: The House and the Yard4. Romantic Suburbs5. The Main Line: Elite Suburbs and Commuter Railroads6. The Time of the Trolley7. Affordable Homes for the Common Man8. Suburbs into Neighborhoods: The Rise and Fall of Municipal Annexation9. The New Age of Automobility10. Suburban Development Between the Wars11. Federal Subsidy and the Suburban Dream: How Washington Changed the American Housing Market12. The Cost of Good Intentions: The Ghettoization of Public Housing in the United States13. The Baby Boom and the Age of the Subdivision14. The Drive-in Culture of Contemporary America15. The Loss of Community in Metropolitan America16. Retrospect and Prospect

From Our Editors

 Tracing three centuries of technological, economic and social innovation, Kenneth T. Jackson, a history professor at Columbia University, presents the first full-scale history of the American suburb. Taking into account several factors including the availability of cheap land, inexpensive building methods and rapid transportation, Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States examines the ways in which American ideals came to be equated with home ownership located far from the urban work environment. This fascinating study looks to communities in every sector of the U.S., comparing American residential patterns with those of Japan and Europe.

Editorial Reviews

"A superb achievement that will set the standard for American social and urban history for a long time to come."--Roger W. Lotchin, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill