Criminal Justice Documents: A Selective, Annotated Bibliography Of U.s. Government Publications…

Hardcover | April 1, 1987

byJohn F. Berens

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"Lucid annotations and discriminating selection distinguish this timely bibliography of 1,098 U.S. government documents published between 1975 and October 1986. Full bibliographic data include Su-Docs number, a time save for depository libraries. Classified under eight broad subject headings, materials cover the criminal justice system, crime and criminals, law enforcement, the courts, corrections, juvenile justice, security, and special resources. . . . [Since] the government has been a principal force in the analysis of crime and its prevention, the importance of a fully annotated guide to its wealth of publications is evident." Booklist

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"Lucid annotations and discriminating selection distinguish this timely bibliography of 1,098 U.S. government documents published between 1975 and October 1986. Full bibliographic data include Su-Docs number, a time save for depository libraries. Classified under eight broad subject headings, materials cover the criminal justice system...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:251 pages, 9.62 × 6.64 × 0.92 inPublished:April 1, 1987Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313251835

ISBN - 13:9780313251832

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"Lucid annotations and discriminating selection distinguish this timely bibliography of 1,098 U.S. government documents published between 1975 and October 1986. Full bibliographic data include Su-Docs number, a time save for depository libraries. Classified under eight broad subject headings, materials cover the criminal justice system, crime and criminals, law enforcement, the courts, corrections, juvenile justice, security, and special resources. Each chapter is further divided. For example, chapter 2, "Crime and Criminals," contains separate sections on such specific crimes as arson, bombings, gambling, homicide, and even computer crime, white-collar crime, and such special topics as women and crime. The descriptive annotations run from 50 to 100 words. The convenient arrangement is augmented by four indexes: author, subject, geographic (many references to Washington, D.C., and New York City), and associations/organizations. The latter cites references to numberous related associations, helpful in locating relevant congressional materials ... [Since] the government has been a principal force in the analysis of crime and its prevention, the importance of a fully annotated guide to its wealth of publications is evident. The author, a university librarian, has made numerous contributions to journals ... With this book, he has made a valuable addition to Greenwood's series in law and political science."-Reference Books Bulletin