Crimsoned Prairie: CRIMSONED PRAIRIE by S. L. A. Marshall

Crimsoned Prairie: CRIMSONED PRAIRIE

byS. L. A. Marshall

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This is the first study of the military tactics employed by the Plains Indians and the U.S. Army in their long war for the American frontier. The Indian Wars were sloppily fought, horribly mis-matched, absurdly wasteful; commanders hunted the Sioux to the accompaniment of brass bands--this apparently to raise troop morale--and reckless charges were more highly rewarded than getting the scouts out, checking communications, or maintaining supply lines.

About The Author

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall (1900-1977) was an accomplished journalist, war correspondent, & historian. One of the preeminent American military writers of our time, he wrote more than thirty books.
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Details & Specs

Title:Crimsoned Prairie: CRIMSONED PRAIRIEFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 8.25 × 5.38 × 0.82 inPublisher:Da Capo Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0306802260

ISBN - 13:9780306802263

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This is the first study of the military tactics employed by the Plains Indians and the U.S. Army in their long war for the American frontier. The Indian Wars were sloppily fought, horribly mis-matched, absurdly wasteful; commanders hunted the Sioux to the accompaniment of brass bands--this apparently to raise troop morale--and reckless charges were more highly rewarded than getting the scouts out, checking communications, or maintaining supply lines.