Critical Conditions: Illness and Disability in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's Writing by Julie Nack NgueCritical Conditions: Illness and Disability in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's Writing by Julie Nack Ngue

Critical Conditions: Illness and Disability in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's Writing

byJulie Nack Ngue

Hardcover | November 17, 2011

Pricing and Purchase Info

$97.39 online 
$119.95 list price
Earn 487 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Out of stock online

Not available in stores

about

Critical Conditions: Reading Illness and Disability in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's Writing, represents a novel approach not only to postcolonial Francophone literature but to literary and cultural studies in general. Julie Nack Ngue's analyses attend not only to the aesthetics of the texts, but to culturally relevant scientific and historical discourses on the body, gender, and race, and to the material conditions that produce and exacerbate illness and disability. Adopting a comparative, interdisciplinary approach, Nack Ngue argues that cultural and literary expressions of illness, suffering, and subjectivity in the postcolonial context are always in dialogue with seemingly external discourses and practices of health. Thus, through sustained analyses of historical, biomedical and sociocultural currents in the context of eight Francophone novels from 1968 to 2003, the book advances a new theory of "critical conditions." These critical conditions represent the conjunction of bodily, psychic, and textual states that defy conventional definitions of health and well-being. The study focuses on Francophone women writers who offer striking commentaries on the experience of illness and/or disability and its attendant discourses: Haitian writer Marie Chauvet; Guadeloupian-Senegalese writer Myriam Warner-Vieyra; Guadeloupian writer Maryse Condé; Senegalese writers Ken Bugul, Fama Diagne Sène, and Fatou Diome; and Swiss-Gabonese writer Bessora. These women's writings disclose figures of illness and disability in the postcolonial context that challenge standard paradigms of women's bodily and psychic health established by Western colonial medicine and racial biology such as those that idealize cure, demand normativity, and assign tragedy to the "unhealthy."
Julie Nack Ngue is assistant professor of French (teaching) at the University of Southern California. She is a contributor to journals such as Wagadu: Journal of Transnational Women's and Gender Studies and to the book collection Emergent Perspectives on Ken Bugul: From Alternative Choices to Oppositional Practices (Jeanne-Sarah de Lar...
Loading
Title:Critical Conditions: Illness and Disability in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's WritingFormat:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 9.46 × 6.36 × 0.79 inPublished:November 17, 2011Publisher:Lexington BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0739151142

ISBN - 13:9780739151143

Reviews

Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsChapter 1: "Staring Back": Visible Difference, Staring, and Uncertain Legibility in Marie Chauvet's Amour and Myriam Warner-Vieyra's JuletaneChapter 2: The Body Composite: Testimony and the Problematic of Integral Healing in Maryse Condé's Heremakhonon and Ken Bugul's Le Baobab fouChapter 3: Towards a New Aesthetic of the Global: Grotesque Bodies, Circulation, and Haunting in Fama Diagne Sène's Le Chant des ténèbres and Ken Bugul's La Folie et la MortChapter 4: Against Quarantine: Foreign Bodies in Excess in Fatou Diome's Le Ventre de l'Atlantique and Bessora's 53 cmEpilogue: In Guise of a Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

Critical Conditions: Illness and Disability in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's Writing is a remarkable new development in interdisciplinary studies. It represents a welcome and much-needed investigation that imports the preoccupations of disability studies into the postcolonial and applies postcolonial methodologies in disability studies. In the process, and this is where this book is most exciting, it carves out in inaugural fashion the significant zone of commonalities between these two seemingly disparate fields.