Critical Moments in Classical Literature: Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and its Uses by Richard HunterCritical Moments in Classical Literature: Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and its Uses by Richard Hunter

Critical Moments in Classical Literature: Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and its Uses

byRichard Hunter

Hardcover | May 29, 2009

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Through a series of innovative critical readings Richard Hunter builds a picture of how the ancients discussed the meaning of literary works and their importance in society. He pays particular attention to the interplay of criticism and creativity by not treating criticism in isolation from the works which the critics discussed. Attention is given both to the development of a history of criticism, as far as our sources allow, and to the constant recurrence of similar themes across the centuries. At the head of the book stands the contest of Aeschylus and Euripides in Aristophanes' Frogs which foreshadows more of the subsequent critical tradition than is often realised. Other chapters are devoted to ancient reflection on Greek and Roman comedy, to the Augustan critic Dionysius of Halicarnassus, to 'Longinus', On the Sublime, and to Plutarch. All Greek and Latin is translated.
Title:Critical Moments in Classical Literature: Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and its UsesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:226 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:May 29, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521519853

ISBN - 13:9780521519854

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Aristophanes' Frogs and the critical tradition; 2. Readings of Homer: Euripides' Cyclops; 3. Comic moments; 4. The ugly peasant and the naked virgins: Dionysius of Halicarnassus, On Imitation; 5. The grand and the less grand: 'Longinus', On the Sublime; 6. Reading for life: Plutarch, How the young man should study poetry.

Editorial Reviews

"... minor reservations aside, this is a thought-provoking and enjoyable book. It is both accessible and challenging, especially in its introduction of little known or discussed texts that usually remain at the outer edges of students' and many scholars' awareness. " --BMCR