Cultural Reformations: Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History

Hardcover | July 15, 2010

EditorBrian Cummings, James Simpson

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The original essays in Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature mean to provoke rather than reassure, to challenge rather than codify. Instead of summarizing existing knowledge scholars working in the field aim at opening fresh discussion; instead of emphasizing settled consensusthey direct their readers to areas of enlivened and unresolved debate.The deepest periodic division in English literary history has been between the Medieval and the Early Modern, not least because the cultural investments in maintaining that division are exceptionally powerful. Narratives of national and religious identity and freedom; of individual liberties; of thehistory of education and scholarship; of reading or the history of the book; of the very possibility of persuasive historical consciousness itself: each of these narratives (and more) is motivated by positing a powerful break around 1500.None of the claims for a profound historical and cultural break at the turn of the fifteenth into the sixteenth centuries is negligible. The very habit of working within those periodic bounds (either Medieval or Early Modern) tends, however, simultaneously to affirm and to ignore the rupture. Itaffirms the rupture by staying within standard periodic bounds, but it ignores it by never examining the rupture itself. The moment of profound change is either, for medievalists, just over an unexplored horizon; or, for Early Modernists, a zero point behind which more penetrating examination isunnecessary. That situation is now rapidly changing. Scholars are building bridges that link previously insular areas. Both periods are starting to look different in dialogue with each other.The change underway has yet to find collected voices behind it. Cultural Reformations volume aims to provide those voices. It will give focus, authority, and drive to a new area.

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The original essays in Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature mean to provoke rather than reassure, to challenge rather than codify. Instead of summarizing existing knowledge scholars working in the field aim at opening fresh discussion; instead of emphasizing settled consensusthey direct their readers to areas of enliven...

Brian Cummings is Professor of English at the University of Sussex and was founding Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies from 2004 to 2008. He received his BA and PhD at Cambridge University, and before moving to Sussex was Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. He is the author of The Literary Culture of the Reformation: Gr...

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Kobo ebook|Sep 8 2011

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:540 pages, 9.69 × 6.73 × 0.1 inPublished:July 15, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199212481

ISBN - 13:9780199212484

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary HistoryBrian Cummings and James Simpson: HistoriesMargreta de Grazia: AnachronismArdis Butterfield: Nation and VernacularityJesse Lander: HistoriographySeth Lerer: Literary HistoriesSpatialitiesJames Simpson: PlaceLynn Staley: Enclosed SpacesAndrew Hadfield: TravelDoctrinesDavid Aers/ Sarah Beckwith: The EucharistJanel Mueller: The SaintsThomas Betteridge: Vernacular TheologyPaul Strohm: ConscienceLegalitiesLorna Hutson: Theatre and JurisdictionTim Machan: When English became LatinDavid Loewenstein: Heresy and TreasonDavid Kastan: Naughty Printed BooksOutside the LawStephen Greenblatt: Utopian PleasureGreg Walker: FollyNicholas Watson: DespairLiteratureHelen Cooper: Fame, Chaucer and English PoetryGordon Teskey: "Literature"Maura Nolan: StyleJulia Boffey: London Books and London ReadersCommunitiesCathy Shrank: CommunityColin Burrow: The Reformation of the HouseholdVincent Gillespie: MonasticismDavid Wallace: NunsLabourJennifer Summit: Active and Contemplative LivesAlexandra Barratt: ChildbirthJames Kearney: IdlenessSelfhoodJohn Parker: PersonaRamie Targoff: PassionBrian Cummings: Autobiography and the History of ReadingIndex