Culture, Identity, And Islamic Schooling: A Philosophical Approach

Paperback | June 15, 2010

byMichael S Merry

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In light of the growing phenomenon of Islamic schools in the United States and Europe, this compelling study outlines whether these schools share similar traits with other religious schools, while posing new challenges to education policy. Merry elaborates an ideal type of Islamic philosophy of education in order to examine the specific challenges that Islamic schools face, comparing the different educational realities facing Muslim populations in the Netherlands, Belgium, and the United States. 

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In light of the growing phenomenon of Islamic schools in the United States and Europe, this compelling study outlines whether these schools share similar traits with other religious schools, while posing new challenges to education policy. Merry elaborates an ideal type of Islamic philosophy of education in order to examine the specifi...

Michael S. Merry is Professor of Philosophy of Education and Chair of the Department of History and Philosophy in the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.56 inPublished:June 15, 2010Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230103537

ISBN - 13:9780230103535

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Table of Contents

Introduction * The Politics of Islamic Schooling: A Comparative Look * Islamic Education between the Ideal and the Real * Educating for Cultural Coherence * The Well-Being of Children and the Limits of Paternalism * For the Sake of the Child: Religious Schools and Accountability * The Future of Islamic Schools

Editorial Reviews

“There is much to admire in this book. Merry is a very skilful academic writer and he argues in a logical and engaging manner, incorporating extensive and interesting footnotes. This is an important book and a significant contribution to scholarship. It is highly recommended.”-- Stephen J. McKinney, University of Glasgow"Especially since 9/11, the West has experienced a desperate need to better understand the Islamic world. In this balanced but critical study, Michael S. Merry tackles the highly controversial issue of identity formation and the education of Muslim children in non-Muslim or even anti-Muslim cultures. In accessible language, Merry articulates the philosophical and political underpinnings of Islamic schooling and then confronts these with the empirical practices of the US, the Netherlands, and Belgium. He not only presents a fully substantiated analysis of the pros and cons of Islamic schooling but also places this analysis within the wider context of the demands and rights of parents, the position of the child, religious education in general, and the obligations of the democratic state for the future of its children. This thought-provoking book is a must for the international audience of educators, policymakers, religious scholars, and philosophers interested in schooling and Islam."--Geert Driessen, Senior Educational Researcher, Radboud University Nijmegen"This book is a critical defense of the possibility of religious schooling, in general, and Islamic schooling, in particular that is consistent with the tenets of multicultural, liberal democracy. It is well written, thoughtful, well argued and timely given the current interest in Islamic education, Muslim immmigration, and tensions between Islam and democratic societies. Since it is largely a philosophical argument about rather perennial tensions between religious schools and liberal democracy, it is likely to have a longer shelf life than more empirical studies."--Jeffrey A. Milligan, Florida State University