D-Day to Carpiquet: The North Shore Regiment and the Liberation of Europe by Marc MilnerD-Day to Carpiquet: The North Shore Regiment and the Liberation of Europe by Marc Milner

D-Day to Carpiquet: The North Shore Regiment and the Liberation of Europe

byMarc Milner

Paperback | May 1, 2007

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The brutal battlefields of Europe during World War II were the testing ground for the young men of the 1st Battalion of the North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment. On June 6, 1944, the soldiers landed on the coast of France as part of the first wave of the D-Day invasion. After securing the eastern flank of the Canadian landing along Juno Beach, the Regiment was in constant contact with the enemy over the next thirty days, suffering a steady stream of casualties. This led to a ferocious battle in the French village of Carpiquet. For five days, the Regiment endured a living hell and suffered nearly 300 casualties. By the end of it, the North Shore Regiment had effectively died.

For the first time, the comprehensive tale of this storied Regiment is finally told. D-Day to Carpiquet is volume 9 in the New Brunswick Military Heritage Series.

Marc Milner, a native of Sackville, NB, is a prolific author of Canadian military history. Co-director of the New Brunswick Military Heritage Project, he is also chair of the University of New Brunswick’s history department, and director of UNB's Brigadier Milton F. Gregg, VC, Centre for the Study of War and Society.
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Title:D-Day to Carpiquet: The North Shore Regiment and the Liberation of EuropeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:138 pages, 7.73 × 5.51 × 0.36 inPublished:May 1, 2007Publisher:GOOSE LANE EDITIONSLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0864924895

ISBN - 13:9780864924896

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"Marc Milner's treatment . . . brings a unique sense of community pride to an event most historians disregard." — Norm Shannon, Esprit de Corps